People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 60

Someone was going to get a big goal
or make a big save.

How did you re-instill that sense of
winning?

Cheryl: What I hope I do and consciously try to be mindful of is hearing
my leaders and essentially getting out
of the way. With my leadership team,
I give them the opportunity to speak
and express themselves. I have allowed
them to lead themselves.

Kevin: In my opinion it is not about
remembering how to win. It is about
understanding the responsibility,
demands, commitments, and sacrifices
that come along with winning. In many
ways it is a lot easier to be an average
team or franchise-the tension and
stress are much less. When you are a
winning team, people know what is at
stake. So it is not about forgetting how
to win-it is remembering that the
demands are higher.

P+S: How important is it for players to
understand the roles of the others on
the team? Is that a nice idea in theory
or is it practical to performance?
Cheryl: It is hugely important.
Gus: You can't win without everyone
knowing each other's role and being
committed as a team.
Bob: Not only do players have to understand what each teammate is doing,
they have to appreciate it and respect
it. They have to acknowledge that their
teammates are doing a role that makes
them more successful. If you don't have
those three things, you are fighting an
uphill battle.
Amy: Every role in an organization is
important. You never know from where
or whom the next great idea will come.
Your receptionist may have the answer to
a fan issue or your groundskeeper may
be a social media aficionado and may
have the best answer to the problem you
are experiencing. The left tackle's job
is to protect the quarterback, but if the
left tackle has a really good idea for the
social media team, you should listen.
Everyone should know that he or she is
empowered to make the organization as
great as he or she can.
Roy: Whether you are a scorer, playmaker, leader in the locker room, or
tough guy, everyone has a role and
everyone needs to know the other guy's
role. If they all play to their respective
role and rely on their teammates to do
the same, you probably have a pretty
good team.
P+S: Did you ever have a team that
didn't know (or had forgotten) how to
win and that you helped turn around?
60

PEOPLE + STRATEGY

Bob: When I was with the Rams, we
went from worst to first. In the process,
we lost Trent Green who was the quarterback we were depending on. Our
backup was a guy named Kurt Warner
who only had four snaps in the NFL.
Nobody knew then that Kurt was going
to be the MVP and a hall of fame
quarterback. But Dick Vermeil stayed
positive. In his press conference he
said, we will rally around Kurt Warner.
I said to the business staff, I don't want
you walking around with your head
down. When you see the coaches and
players you smile and tell them we will
be ok. Let them know we are all in this
together. A year later one of the guys
said that was the most important thing
I ever said to them.
Amy: Bob, I can absolutely envision
you not only being the leader who said
that, but I can envision you sharing
those words with the staff, acting as
a leader, and then going to a private
place and saying, "Oh my gosh, we lost
our quarterback." You were the leader
the organization needed at the time,
even though you knew how bad the
situation could be.
Kevin: I was a VP at the Rams that
same season, and the team did rally
and we had a regular season record
of 13-3 with an 8-0 record at home,
and a 16-3 overall record, and none
of our players had been injured. But
you know what I took away from that,
too? Despite all of this-and despite
the fact that we had the NFL Offensive Player of the Year and the NFL
MVP-we still only won the Super

Bowl by one yard. That is always in
the back of my head: there is no
time to let up. It comes back to the
demands of winning being that much
higher.
Cheryl: The best example I have is my
first season in the WBNA as an assistant
coach. We started the season off 1-10.
The likelihood of being a playoff team
or even making it to the finals was slim
to none. We would be in every game
and one or two things would not go our
way-such as a missed shot or a call that
didn't go in our favor-and we would
lose the game. Despite this, we stayed
our course, believed in it, and stuck together as a team. We ended up making
the playoffs and got all the way to the
finals. It was an unbelievable journey.
Gus: I've had a similar experience.
The first team I ever coached was soft
and not winning. When I inherited
them, they were losing games by 20
points. I completely changed our
approach. It was like turning a ship
around and they didn't like it. Every
day was a fight. I stuck with it and
by the next season we were winning.
The bad attitudes were gone, the
system had started to gel, my philosophy was in place, and the kids were
buying in.
Roy: It's tough to turn a team around
from a losing streak. I believe it all
comes back to your philosophy and
system. In addition, as a leader you
need to stop coaching the obvious.
Saying, "We need to skate faster" or
"Don't pass pucks through people" is
the obvious. Instead, coach in between
the margins such as, "If you are on
the wall and you pivot to a new spot,
you bring yourself from one option to
three options."
Cheryl: I tell my team all the time that
how you treat each other is incredibly
important, especially in the tough
moments. Staying the course is one of
the hardest things to do when you are
1-10, but Anne Donovan was persistent
and the team was dedicated. That
team was great-they liked each other,
they played for each other, and they
stuck together. It paid off.



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2

From the Executive Editor
From the Guest Editor
Perspectives
Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
The Rise of Digital Team Building
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Executive Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 5
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Guest Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 7
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 9
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 10
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 11
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 12
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 13
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 14
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 15
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 17
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 18
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 19
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 20
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 21
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 23
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 24
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 25
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 26
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 27
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 28
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 29
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 31
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 32
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 33
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 34
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 35
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 37
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 38
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 39
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 40
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 41
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 43
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 44
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 45
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 47
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 48
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 49
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 50
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 51
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - The Rise of Digital Team Building
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 53
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 54
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 55
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 57
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 58
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 59
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 60
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 61
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - In First Person
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 63
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 64
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 65
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 67
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 68
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 69
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 71
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 73
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 74
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover4
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