People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 71

Bloom-Feshbach and Marie Poyet offer
thoughtful commentary on evolving
trends in this area. What is safe to
assume is an ongoing need for team
members to have conversations about
what is working well and what can be
better. Debriefing technology such as
the one described by Denise Reyes and
co-authors holds particular promise.
Analytics can be applied to teams
just like other HR practices. Another
aspect of digital teaming on the rise
is the capacity to obtain data about
naturally forming groups; social network analysis, described in our Spring
2016 issue, captures the informal
network of relationships and invisible
teaming across the workplace. Just
as powerful is the growing ability to
anticipate team dysfunction due to
configuration of member personality
attributes; for more on this, go back
to the interview with Suzanne Bell or
Reece Akhtar and Uri Ort's article on
entrepreneurial teams.
Have a model to guide your focus.
This may be one of the most important insights to act upon: a model or
framework about teams will help you
know what to focus on, enable you to
assess the team on various dimensions,
and allow you to tailor support to what
will really add value. Dianne Nilsen and
Gordon Curphy provide one with their
Rocket ModelTM; Winsborough does
with his hard, soft, and deep design
rules; Darko Lovric and co-authors do
as well for ignition teams. Several of the
sports leaders featured in our executive
roundtable referred to a "system" that
guides their action without forcing rigid team leadership. Whatever language
you use, a well-thought-out framework
is essential; you might even have more
than one and flip between them for
different circumstances. Having no
model, however, increases likelihood
you will waste your time and that of the
teams you wish to assist.
Learn to see team dynamics with a
more powerful lens. Do you remember the first time you looked through
a microscope and saw a world that was
previously invisible? Jean Brittain Leslie and her co-authors offer a lens into

virtual team dynamics just as powerful.
They see team dynamics as the inevitable interplay of competing values (for
example, formal vs. informal rules).
Teams get stuck, even polarized,
when some members can only see the
upside of one value and the downside
of the opposing value. To get unstuck
we must address these polarities and
see them, map them, tap them-be
ready to recognize naturally occurring
competing values as they surface; map
or list the upside of each opposing
value as well as the downside when
you have too much of one to exclusion
of the opposing value; tap the energy
that emerges when we simultaneously
address the upside of both values and
surface early warning signals that one
value is overshadowing the opposing
one.2 A lens like this can guide your
attention and choice of action, allowing you to mediate what previously
seemed like paralyzing team issues.
Develop helpful routines. Plan,
do, check, and act is a time-honored
process improvement approach. Such
thinking also applies to teams, as
ongoing improvement is guided by
intentional action and reflection. The
five balancing acts described by Lovric
for ignition teams are actually mental
and behavioral practices your team can
readily adopt. Reyes and her co-authors' focus on debriefing meetings
is another great example. These are
all examples of what Bell refers to as
healthy patterns of team dynamics. I
think of this as "teaming," not just being a team. Given the great many teams
we all seem to be on at any one time,
wouldn't you want members who are
experienced and skilled at such types
of teaming?
Think beyond your own team. Much
of the real work of teams occurs on and
across the team boundary: this is visible
in how the team works with its sponsor and with other teams. As Akhtar
and Ort illustrate for entrepreneurial
teams, more effective ones discover
how to leverage their social capital to
acquire knowledge on how to operate
effectively and overcome obstacles
outside the team. My hunch is that we
devote disproportionate time focusing

on dynamics within the team, and too
little time focusing on how the team
and its members can be more effective
across team boundaries.
Adapt your team EQ to different
types of teams. Beyond having a
diagnostic framework to assess team
dynamics, it helps to recognize there
are many team configurations; some
are appropriate for one context but
disastrous for another. Not all teams
should look or act the same. Most of
us simultaneously belong to multiple
teams, with different roles, structure
and dynamics. Our use of emotional
intelligence (EQ) can help us within
and across teams. Several participants
of the executive roundtable actively
employ such concepts (but not this
same language) as they assess and develop world-class sports teams. I suspect
many readers can quickly think of at
least one colleague who excels applying
emotional intelligence to teams; the
opportunity is to codify that and apply
it across a wide range of team configurations.
One final thought about the team
mindset: readers may be familiar with
Carol Dweck's distinction between a
fixed vs. growth mindset.3 Now imagine the actions of a team with a fixed
mindset vs. one that has a growth
mindset. The former will simply assess
themselves as a great, not-so-great,
or ineffective team; they may assume
success or failure is inevitable, restrict
effort to certain opportunities, and play
the blame game when things don't go
well. The team with a growth mindset,
in contrast, will constantly evaluate
itself against the effort applied and how
they consciously work to improve their
collective performance. Which mindset
do you want to foster among the teams
in your organization?
You can see descriptions of this in Kenwyn
Smith and David Berg's classic book,
Paradoxes of Group Life. 1987. Jossey-Bass.
2
In addition to the article in this issue, see
Barry Johnson's book, Polarity Management: Identifying and Managing Unsolvable Problems. 1992. Human Resource
Development.
3
Dweck, Carol. Mindset: The New Psychology
of Success. 2007. Ballatine Books.
1

VOLUME 41 | ISSUE 2 | SPRING 2018

71



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2

From the Executive Editor
From the Guest Editor
Perspectives
Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
The Rise of Digital Team Building
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Executive Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 5
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Guest Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 7
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 9
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 10
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 11
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 12
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 13
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 14
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 15
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 17
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 18
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 19
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 20
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 21
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 23
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 24
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 25
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 26
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 27
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 28
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 29
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 31
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 32
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 33
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 34
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 35
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 37
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 38
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 39
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 40
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 41
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 43
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 44
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 45
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 47
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 48
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 49
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 50
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 51
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - The Rise of Digital Team Building
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 53
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 54
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 55
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 57
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 58
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 59
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 60
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 61
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - In First Person
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 63
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 64
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 65
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 67
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 68
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 69
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 71
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 73
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 74
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover4
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