People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 9

David Creelman, the founder of
Creelman Research, highlights the
paradox of making choices between
individuals and their teams. Like that
proverbial short blanket, which way is
the leader to pull and how does he/she
lead the team out of the individual vs.
collective dilemma?
Michael Bungay Stanier, CEO and
coach, completes our selection with a
set of promising strategies for teams.
Bungay Stanier targets the "deep
design" and advises leaders and team
members alike on how to become
coach-like on the team.
The diversity of these perspectives
speaks to the existing gap between what
we know about the importance of teams
today and how inadequate our current
organizational practices really are. If
there is one thing all our contributors
agree on, it is that the future of work
is with the teams. It will take all of us
to stay on the journey towards a much
more collaborative workplace. This Perspectives could be our starting point.

Anna Tavis, Ph.D., is associate professor of
human capital management at New York
University, Perspectives editor, and coeditor
of Point Counterpoint II. She can be reached
at anna.tavis@nyu.edu.

POI N T

The Rise of Teams at
Work
By Dave Winsborough

P

eter Drucker wrote, "The major
incentives to productivity and
efficiency are social and moral
rather than financial," which is a sentiment very few organizations comprehend, never mind put into practice.
That means most organizations rely on
engendering staff productivity through
their pay-packets or share option
schemes, which research has shown to
be ineffective.1 For those organizations
who understand that employee motivation is more than just a 1-1 relationship

with dollars, the dominant approaches
involve job enrichment, employee engagement improvements, or in the case
of many tech firms, the provision of
faux-luxury pampering. A rather more
different approach has been adopted
by the world's most successful and
productive sovereign wealth fund. The
NZ Super Fund has become the world's
fastest growing since its establishment
in 2001. Outgoing CEO Adrian Orr
attributes some of this success to a primary shift in how it managed its people
when he took up his role in 2007. "We
changed the definition of talent from a
few individuals to teams."
Orr's approach is fast becoming

atomized work and ushered in the idea
that people are simply fungible components of a system.5 Industrial thinking
reached its apogee in Taylor's scientific
management approach and was brutally
revealed in Henry Ford's observation
that of the 7,882 manual procedures
required to assemble the Model T car,
2,637 could be done by one-legged
men; 670 by legless men; 715 by onearmed men; and 2 by an armless men.
Yet teams will continue to grow in
importance for four key reasons.
* Knowledge and service work is
growing less structured and roles are
becoming blurrier. Completing tasks
for many employees means dealing

Google's Project Aristotle researched
high-performance teams because the
giant tech company holds that employees
can achieve more together than as individuals.
common in the hardnosed financial
industry. Research shows that teams are
less prone to irrationality, make better
decisions in uncertain environments,
and can outperform individually managed funds.2,3 Similarly, Google's Project
Aristotle researched high performance
teams because the giant tech company
holds that employees can achieve more
together than as individuals. And in the
military, ideas like Stanley McChrystal's
teams of teams are no doctrine.
Although using teams as a motivation and productivity enhancer sounds
commonplace, it isn't. Consider that
performance management systems in
almost all organizations are individually
focused, as are leadership development
interventions. The business world still
fetishes examples of rock-star outlier
individual performance, like Jeff Bezos,
Richard Branson, or Anita Roddick, despite evidence that in jobs that require
interdependent working, adding more
talent can reduce overall effectiveness.4
As I point out in my new book,
Fusion: The Psychology of Teams, it got this
way because the industrial revolution,
with its powerful machine metaphor,

with colleagues across continents,
time zones, organizational divisions,
systems, people employed by partner
firms, contractors, and even gig
workers. The very concept of the
firm is morphing. In this environment teams intensify the focus on
the task and provide clarity of purpose for those involved. This trend
is reflected in the growing number
of smart tech platforms and systems
that are emerging to help teams
coordinate and communicate. Slack,
Workplace, Crocagile, Bitrix24, and
similar tools are enabling teamwork at the level of systems and
processes-in other words, flexible
team-working will become encoded
in an organization's DNA.
* Teams offer a flexibility and agility
that is highly desirable. General
Stanley McChrystal fundamentally
shifted the U.S. Army's approach
in Afghanistan because the enemy
operated as autonomous, reactive,
highly agile cells, yet were coordinated in strategy, which was leading
them to victory.6 McChrystal copied
the philosophy, delayering Army
VOLUME 41 | ISSUE 2 | SPRING 2018

9



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2

From the Executive Editor
From the Guest Editor
Perspectives
Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
The Rise of Digital Team Building
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Executive Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 5
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Guest Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 7
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 9
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 10
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 11
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 12
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 13
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 14
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 15
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 17
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 18
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 19
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 20
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 21
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 23
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 24
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 25
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 26
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 27
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 28
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 29
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 31
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 32
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 33
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 34
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 35
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 37
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 38
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 39
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 40
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 41
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 43
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 44
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 45
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 47
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 48
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 49
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 50
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 51
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - The Rise of Digital Team Building
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 53
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 54
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 55
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 57
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 58
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 59
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 60
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 61
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - In First Person
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 63
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 64
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 65
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 67
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 68
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 69
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 71
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 73
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 74
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover4
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