ITE Journal March 2018 - 29

view, and sharing that is helping transportation professionals
like May think differently about how to use highway safety funds
to make roads safer for all users, such as through bigger, more
reflective signs and pavement markings.

community can get involved in supporting more effective transit
and ridesharing, stating, "we want to create communities where
people are happy to give up their cars when needed, because there
are good, affordable options."

Aging is Not a Medical Condition!

Next Steps for the Ohio Statewide
Implementation Team

Driving is important to the well-being of many older adults. It's
often a primary mode of transportation, and it has a strong link to
physical and mental health. There are a range of options available
to help older adults continue to drive safely that do not necessarily
involve giving up the keys. There is also a distinction that we need
to make between normal aging and medical conditions. Normal
aging includes gradual changes in vision, physical, and mental
abilities that can affect driving ability. But there are lots of tools
that can help drivers assess their ability and develop strategies to
improve their driving. Medical conditions such as diabetes, strokes,
and dementia significantly affect safe driving and require medical
assistance and responses.
Suspending someone's driver's license even when clearly
indicated may still be harmful to that person in its own way, the loss
of transportation cutting them off from socialization and being able
to access basic needs. As a result, we need to use the right tools and
involve the right people in evaluating and responding to a person's
fitness for safe driving.
One of May's biggest lessons learned from Davis is that when it
comes to assessing at-risk drivers, professionals have to ensure they
are using the right tools and involving the right people at the right
time. It's also important to look at a broad range of options to help
seniors continue driving, as long as they can do it safely. There is a
difference between a driving test and a medical driving evaluation
in determining a person's ability to drive. For example, referring
an older adult with Parkinson's Disease to a driver examination
station may not be as effective as referring them to an occupational
therapist. The occupational therapist will have a much greater
understanding of how the medical condition can affect safe driving
than a one-time skills test of driving that day.
Davis finds that in approaching the issue of aging drivers since
2003, the biggest change we have seen is the movement from a
focus on assessment alone to now making assessment just one
piece of a bigger plan. That bigger plan includes the inclusion of
options to address impairments in an effort to retain the license to
offering aging drivers other transportation options. Most people are
reluctant to give up driving because they fear that the loss of their
license will leave them stranded. But if a citizen knows that the state
has available and accessible options for them to get around, it leads
to a different mindset. In that scenario, the state is not addressing
safety by simply taking away, but rather through a supportive
message to maintain mobility by accessing other options. May
believes there is a way that engineers and the transportation

Since learning more about the challenges of older driver safety
and how to address them, Ohio's Statewide Action Team has
outlined recommendations for engineers, planners, and educators/
community outreach teams. A smaller committee has morphed
into the implementation team that is now prioritizing these
strategies and action steps for potential funding and investment.
The committee is focused on four key areas: Education, Licensing,
Infrastructure, and Alternative Transportation.

Education
In 2018, the implementation team wants to develop and market
materials that help older drivers, caregivers, law enforcement,
engineers, and others assess the impact of aging on safe driving.
The team also wants to sponsor educational forums and events.

Licensing
The implementation team plans to review national best practices for
assessing and licensing older drivers. It will examine what changes
need to be made as a state to effectively assess older drivers who
have been identified as a safety concern. The goal is to make that
process fair and effective.

The Toward Zero Deaths Safety Network meetings such as this one are an
opportunity to build relationships between the various disciplines involved
in traffic safety and health care; foster professional development by
featuring nationally recognized speakers on topics related to traffic safety;
and recognize outstanding work by safety professionals across Ohio.
w w w .i t e.or g

M arch 2018

29


http://www.ite.org

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of ITE Journal March 2018

ITE Journal March 2018 - 1
ITE Journal March 2018 - 2
ITE Journal March 2018 - 3
ITE Journal March 2018 - 4
ITE Journal March 2018 - 5
ITE Journal March 2018 - 6
ITE Journal March 2018 - 7
ITE Journal March 2018 - 8
ITE Journal March 2018 - 9
ITE Journal March 2018 - 10
ITE Journal March 2018 - 11
ITE Journal March 2018 - 12
ITE Journal March 2018 - 13
ITE Journal March 2018 - 14
ITE Journal March 2018 - 15
ITE Journal March 2018 - 16
ITE Journal March 2018 - 17
ITE Journal March 2018 - 18
ITE Journal March 2018 - 19
ITE Journal March 2018 - 20
ITE Journal March 2018 - 21
ITE Journal March 2018 - 22
ITE Journal March 2018 - 23
ITE Journal March 2018 - 24
ITE Journal March 2018 - 25
ITE Journal March 2018 - 26
ITE Journal March 2018 - 27
ITE Journal March 2018 - 28
ITE Journal March 2018 - 29
ITE Journal March 2018 - 30
ITE Journal March 2018 - 31
ITE Journal March 2018 - 32
ITE Journal March 2018 - 33
ITE Journal March 2018 - 34
ITE Journal March 2018 - 35
ITE Journal March 2018 - 36
ITE Journal March 2018 - 37
ITE Journal March 2018 - 38
ITE Journal March 2018 - 39
ITE Journal March 2018 - 40
ITE Journal March 2018 - 41
ITE Journal March 2018 - 42
ITE Journal March 2018 - 43
ITE Journal March 2018 - 44
ITE Journal March 2018 - 45
ITE Journal March 2018 - 46
ITE Journal March 2018 - 47
ITE Journal March 2018 - 48
ITE Journal March 2018 - 49
ITE Journal March 2018 - 50
ITE Journal March 2018 - 51
ITE Journal March 2018 - 52
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110939_ITE_November2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110110_ITE_October2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G110109_ITE_September2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G108559_ITE_August2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G108250_ITE_July2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G107225_ITE_June2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104039_ITE_May2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104038_ITE_April2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G104036_ITE_March2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G103582_ITE_February2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G102868_ITE_January2019
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G100155_ITE_December2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G100154_ITE_November2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G99495_ITE_October2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G98028_ITE_September2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G97366_ITE_August2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G96287_ITE_July2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G94315_ITE_June2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G93877_ITE_May2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G93065_ITE_Apr2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G91484_ITE_Mar2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G89434_ITE_Feb2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ITE/G86608_ITE_Jan2018
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com