Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 6)

By Brenda Battat Thirty Years! The Hearing Loss Association of America® is celebrating the vision of its founder, Rocky Stone, who saw a need all those years ago for an organization to represent people who are hard of hearing. He pushed to have people who are hard of hearing and their distinct needs recognized. e have made progress in the past three decades but still have work to do to get the right accommodations such as CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation) and assistive listening devices (ALDS) in public places. Three actively engaged and committed members of HLAA recently asked me to correct the misinformation being propagated by some Deaf organizations about hard of hearing persons. Their ire was triggered by the latest statement on the National Association of the Deaf’s (NAD) new website where it claimed to be: © Cindy Dyer W “…the nation’s premier civil rights organization of, by and for deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the United States of America” My response to our members was that although I hear their concerns loud and clear, I do not think challenging another organization’s mission statement will achieve our goal of meeting the needs of people who are hard of hearing. Criticizing organizations for what they publicly say is not going to clarify the confusion of who serves who; but, rather, it will create a combative environment that will hinder the close working relationship we currently have among the organizations for people with hearing loss. For example, we work collaboratively with NAD and others to get national laws passed, such as the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act, the Hearing Aid Tax Credit, and telecommunications relay service improvements. Different organizations are needed to respond to the needs of people with varying degrees of hearing loss and philosophies. In my opinion, people who are hard of hearing join HLAA whose mission specifically addresses their needs. They look to HLAA for information on hearing aids, cochlear implants, and hearing assistive technology. They look for coping skills, mutual support, and to understand the psychosocial impact of untreated hearing loss. They also look to HLAA to support prevention, treatment, and research for cures for hearing loss. I believe the proactive way to deal with disagreement about types of communication access needs is for people with hearing loss to be more outspoken about our needs. And for all of us—individuals, organizations within and outside HLAA—to advocate hard for CART and ALDs in any place and any time that sign language interpreters are provided. For example, we have advocated with the Obama Administration and asked for CART at recent national events where HLAA staff was present. They provided CART along with sign language interpreters. From the Executive Director’s Desk Times are Changing The first wave of babies who received cochlear implants is now reaching early adulthood. They have been mainstreamed in school and many of them also use sign language. Using sign language is not seen as part of their culture, but rather, as a skill to pull out when they need it, much as you would if you speak French or Spanish and find yourself in a situation where you cannot communicate. Of the 60 young adults who attended the HLAA convention for the first time in Nashville last June, many of them use sign language but are most comfortable speaking and identifying themselves as being hard of hearing, not deaf. Deanne Bray, the actress featured on our cover shows how she moves effortlessly among the deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing communities using sign language, a hearing aid, and speaking—whatever the situation calls for. Follow HLAA on Twitter http://twitter.com/HLAA 6 Hearing Loss Magazine http://twitter.com/HLAA

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009

Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009

Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 1)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 2)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 3)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 4)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 5)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 6)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 7)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 8)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 9)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 10)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 11)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 12)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 13)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 14)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 15)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 16)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 17)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 18)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 19)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 20)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 21)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 22)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 23)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 24)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 25)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 26)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 27)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 28)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 29)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 30)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 31)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 32)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 33)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 34)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 35)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 36)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 37)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 38)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 39)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 40)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 41)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 42)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 43)
Hearing Loss Nov Dec 2009 - (Page 44)
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ygs/G15179_Nxtbook2
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ygs/g14434_hlaa_mayjune2010
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ygs/G13492_hlaa_converted
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ygs/G12794HLAA_JanFeb10
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ygs/g11892hlaanovdec09
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ygs/g10882_sept_oct09
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com