Airport Business - 26

COVER STORY
reconstructing a fourth of the taxiway's
pavement, including the connector to
the end of the runway. "Which means
we were having to reconstruct inside the
runway safety area all the way up to the
edge of the runway," he said.
"The project a l so i ncluded
rehabilitation of about another quarter of
the parallel taxiway, where the pavement
was in better condition than the area that
was reconstructed, which consisted of,
some small repairs, some panel removal
and replacement, some joint replacement,"
Sander continued. "We felt like there
was enough remaining service life in
the existing pavement that it made
sense to rehabilitate that portion, versus
reconstruct the whole thing."
The work involved a 45-day closure
of the runway used by both FedEx and
UPS, requiring coordination with
the tenants to ensure their operations
continued smoothly as the work
progressed.
"They both have daily f lights that
couldn't be interrupted. And so, we had
to program the work in order to maintain
those operations. We engaged with the
stakeholders during the design and they
were very helpful in modifying their
operations and they honestly worked
together really well in order to allow the
construction to move forward as quickly
and efficiently as possible," said Sander.
Sander said the work was phased
to be more streamlined and reduce the
amount of time the runway was closed.
A unique aspect of the SGF project
was the utilization of techniques that
Crawford, Murphy & Tilly have been
developing and testing at St. Louis
Lambert International Airport (STL).
When an airport has thick, existing,
concrete pavement that has to be removed
and replaced, it must be replaced at
approximately the current elevation
so that it can tie into the pavements
surrounding it, resulting in a lot of
material to remove.
"The concrete isn't good enough to
serve as a taxiway surface anymore, but
there's a lot of intrinsic value still left in
that material from a structural standpoint,"
Sander described. "One of the things
that we did is repurpose the concrete
that was removed as a subbase layer at the
bottom of the pavement structure. This
creates a construction platform so that

once you get that rubblized pavement
in place, you've got some weatherproof
ability built into your pavement structure
that allows the rest of the construction
to move forward. Even after you get a
heavy rain, you've got a stable platform
for the contractor to work on. It's also
a good base that works as a part of the
overall pavement design."
Above the rubblized base is an open
grated cement-treated aggregate, which
has been employed at STL for 20 years,
and was recently approved by the FAA
to make the material available to airports
across the country, said Sander.
"What that does is allow the
pavements to basically drain all the
water out of the sub grade. One of the
primary things you learn in civil design
school is having wet sub grades reduces
the overall strength and durability of your
pavements. So having this open grated
sub grade really creates a funnel to get all
the water that is underneath that taxiway
out away from there, which we believe to
greatly increase the service life of these
types of pavements," Sander said.
The project is scheduled to be
completed by Oct. 31 but will likely be
completed sometime in the early weeks
of October. if the project continues at
the pace it has been.

Van Nuys
In March, the Van Nuys Airport (VNY)
completed the design and construction
project for its Taxiway B project and
began work on the Taxiway A project.
The program was to reconstruct the
8,000-foot-long asphalt Taxiway A
and Taxiway B pavement including
shoulders. The work included widening
of taxiway intersections to meet new
design standards, upgrade of lighting with
new LED taxiway centerline and edge
lights, signage upgrades, new runway
guard lights as well as other grading and
drainage improvement.
Taxiway B's budget was $29,722,000
and Taxiway A's budget is $35,481,000.
Mark Vicelja, VNY's senior airports
engineer II, said planning for the projects
began in 2014, with the construction of
Taxiway B starting in January 2019 and
the work on Taxiway A scheduled to be
completed in May.
"The pavement was in various states
of deterioration varying from excessive

26 \ AIRPORTBUSINESS / OCTOBER 2020

oxidation and d-cracking to rutting and
full structural failure and spalling," said
Vicelja.
The program initially was anticipated
to be designed and constructed as three
different projects over three years
to optimize FAA federal funding.
However, it was ultimately procured
and constructed utilizing two separate
construction packages - one for all of
Taxiway B and one for Taxiway A, Vicelja
detailed.
Ali Aoude, project engineer, HNTB,
said the project began with data collection
before the engineering team moved into
the design phase.
"This entailed extensive research
of historical data from past projects on
the airfield, topographic survey within
the project limits, and geotechnical
investigation of both Taxiways A and B,"
said Aoude. "From there, we dove straight
into design, focusing on all aspects of
the taxiway reconstruction. The scope
included an upgraded taxiway geometry,
full depth pavement reconstruction with a
20-year design life, grading and drainage
improvements, upgraded LED lights and
signs and marking improvements."
One of the main challenges of the
program stemmed from both taxiways
abutting existing lease holds and
taxilanes, so maintaining access to the
various leaseholds required breaking
the construction into multiple smaller
segments. Both taxiways also encroached
into the main Runway 16R-34L safety
area on the southern section of the airfield
and, additionally, Taxiway B encroached
into the smaller Runway 16L-34R
safety area on the northern section of
the airfield.
"The most critical factor we had
to keep in mind was dividing the
construction limits in such a manner
to mitigate operational impacts to the
airport. We had to be cognizant of the
construction time frames and work area



Airport Business

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Airport Business

Inside the Fence: A Cold November Rain
Industry Update
Airport 5G Moves form Concept to Reality
Making Strides on Diversity and Inclusion in Aviation
How the Industry is Working to Combat COVID-19
Paving the Airfield
Airport Guru: Clearing the Air About Exclusive Rights at Airports
Legal Matters: Leasing Pitfalls in and Around Airports
The Right Stuff
Layer Surveillance Radar Technology into Physical Security Solutions for Real-Time Detection of Threats at Airport Sites
Product Profile: Go Quiet, Go Smooth, Go Big with Schweiss Hydraulic Doors
Airport Business - 1
Airport Business - 2
Airport Business - 3
Airport Business - 4
Airport Business - 5
Airport Business - Inside the Fence: A Cold November Rain
Airport Business - 7
Airport Business - Industry Update
Airport Business - 9
Airport Business - 10
Airport Business - 11
Airport Business - 12
Airport Business - 13
Airport Business - Airport 5G Moves form Concept to Reality
Airport Business - 15
Airport Business - 16
Airport Business - 17
Airport Business - Making Strides on Diversity and Inclusion in Aviation
Airport Business - 19
Airport Business - How the Industry is Working to Combat COVID-19
Airport Business - 21
Airport Business - 22
Airport Business - 23
Airport Business - Paving the Airfield
Airport Business - 25
Airport Business - 26
Airport Business - 27
Airport Business - 28
Airport Business - 29
Airport Business - Airport Guru: Clearing the Air About Exclusive Rights at Airports
Airport Business - 31
Airport Business - Legal Matters: Leasing Pitfalls in and Around Airports
Airport Business - 33
Airport Business - The Right Stuff
Airport Business - 35
Airport Business - Layer Surveillance Radar Technology into Physical Security Solutions for Real-Time Detection of Threats at Airport Sites
Airport Business - 37
Airport Business - Product Profile: Go Quiet, Go Smooth, Go Big with Schweiss Hydraulic Doors
Airport Business - 39
Airport Business - 40
Airport Business - 41
Airport Business - 42
Airport Business - 43
Airport Business - 44
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