CCMS Medicine Fall 2017 - 20

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CDC Invests Hundreds of Millions for
ID Surveillance, Control and Prevention
BY JOHN P. MAHER, MD, MPH

A

ccording to a recent Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) news release, the CDC has awarded
more than $300 million in FFY 2017 through their
Epidemiology & Laboratory Capacity (ELC) cooperative
agreement, "to help states, cities, counties, and territories to
prevent, detect, respond to, and control the growing threats
posed by emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases."
Some might wonder why such an extraordinary amount
of public monies is being used that way in a year marked by
hurricanes, tornadoes, drought, floods, and now mass shootings.
However, for those of us who have spent a large portion of
their professional lives involved in such things as planning for
and prevention of WMD attacks, pandemics, and/or all types
of emergencies, surveillance and planning was, and continues
to be, a major component of such preparedness planning.
Any scanning of the CDC, WHO, PAHO, or pro-MED
websites quickly makes us aware that, on a global level, such
potential hazards as Ebola, MERS, Zika, Chikingunya, and
even pneumonic plague or vaccine-strain related poliomyelitis
continue to occur all over the world and could be only a plane
ride, a tourist trip, a military deployment, or a commercial
freighter shipment away from us.
HIV/AIDS, WNV, Lyme Disease and other tick-borne
diseases are already well established here in the United States,
and recent issues of this publication (Chester County Medicine)
have discussed such entities as TB, Syphilis, unpasteurized milk
and dairy food-related infections, and even non-Tuberculous
Mycobacterial (NTM) infections following open heart surgery.
Sadly, even after that last article, an outbreak of NTM infections
in child heart patients was reported from New Orleans
Children's Hospital this past summer.
Time was, as some of our older physicians will remember,
we were told that the age of antibiotics and vaccines had put
an end to the age of infectious diseases. However, as an old TV
commercial used to say, "It's not nice to fool Mother Nature!"
and we quickly learned the truth of the old adage that "Nature

2 0 C H E S T E R C O U N T Y M e d i c i n e | FA L L 2 0 1 7

abhors a vacuum." Newer emerging diseases have arisen in our
lifetimes to replace old ones, and a number of older ones have
become resurgent for a variety of reasons.
On top of that, this year's hurricane season has ravaged
several U.S. states and Caribbean islands, resulting in
environmental and social conditions conducive to an increasing
incidence and spread of many diseases, including food-, water-,
and vector-borne tropical diseases. But, those conditions aside,
the U.S. has been dealing domestically with several of its own
infectious disease situations throughout 2017.
STDs are at a record level here in the U.S., indicating
an urgent need for prevention. More than 2 million cases of
Chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis were reported in 2016
(and those were only the "reported" cases!). That is the highest
number ever according to CDC's annual STD Surveillance
Report which says that "the numbers are growing and outpacing
our ability to respond."
In addition, we continue to hear of localized outbreaks of E.
coli O-157 and HUS cases such as those recently reported from
North Carolina where 6 children were hospitalized. Around the
nation 268 cases (including 9 viremic blood donors) of Zika
infection have been identified in 40 states, and a Pennsylvania
teenager was diagnosed with Melioidosis this summer after
returning from a volunteer service program in Thailand.
In 2017 alone, the CDC reported a number of outbreaks of
various Salmonella species (urbana, infantis, anatum, thompson,
kiambu, gaminara, and typhimurium). Many cases were related
to Maradol papayas imported from Mexico, but others were
due to exposures to pet turtles and backyard chicken flocks, or
to laboratory error exposures. More than 1.2 million illnesses
and 450 deaths annually occur due to non-typhoidal Salmonella
causes. Also in 2017, an outbreak of Campylobacter affected
people in 7 states (FL, KS, MO, OH, PA, TN, WI) exposed to
puppies sold through a chain of pet stores.
Since March, 2017, CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis


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CCMS Medicine Fall 2017

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of CCMS Medicine Fall 2017

CCMS Medicine Fall 2017 - 1
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https://www.nxtbook.com/hoffmann/CCMSMedicine/ChesterCountyMedicineSpring2021
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https://www.nxtbook.com/hoffmann/CCMSMedicine/ChesterCountyMedicineSpring2018
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