MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 9

mon t m e d s o c .c om

In 2005, the Base Realignment and
Closure Commission targeted NAS
Willow Grove to close, with the 913th
to deactivate, although the Air National
Guard unit stationed there would
remain. With this in mind, I decided to
transfer to the Pennsylvania Air National
Guard's 111th Fighter Wing. Just prior
to my transfer, however, I volunteered
to participate in a humanitarian mission
to Panama. Operation New Horizons is
an ongoing mission that sends teams of
doctors, nurses, optometrists, dentists and
veterinarians to poor rural underserved
areas in Panama to provide medical and
veterinary services. We spent 14 days
going to three remote areas in Panama,
treating inhabitants, some of whom had
never seen a doctor or dentist before. I
came across many tropical diseases that I
had previously only read about. One of
the villages was so remote that the natives
there only spoke an Indian dialect, and we
utilized two translators - Indian to Spanish
and Spanish to English. The gratitude that
the inhabitants of these villages expressed
was overwhelming. I was to participate
in a similar mission, albeit with much
more modern facilities, in 2014 to Kodiak
Island, Alaska.
On May 30, 2007, I transferred to the
Air National Guard. I was appointed chief
of clinical services, and took over pretty
much the same duties I had before. Over
the next few years, I had the opportunity
for some excellent additional training. In
2008, I attended the Combat Casualty
Care Course (C4) at Fort Sam Houston
in San Antonio. In this course, doctors
and nurses from each of the three services
received training in tactical battlefield care
in both role one and role two facilities.
Through an ongoing program, CSTARS
(Centers for the Sustainment of Trauma
And Readiness Skills) at the University of
St. Louis, I functioned as a fellow on the
trauma team at a level one trauma center.
The next year's annual tour was at Tripler
Army Medical Center in Hawaii, where I
was able to spend two weeks working in
the intensive care unit.
Aeromedical evacuation, the transport
of injured war fighters out of the AOR

(area of responsibility) to higher levels of
care, is one of the core competencies of the
Air Force Medical Service. 80% of the Air
Force's aerovac capability lies in the reserve
component, the Air Force Reserve and Air
National Guard. An operational AE unit
consists of 3 to 5 flight nurses, and 5 to 7

MCMS PHYSICIAN 9 FALL 2017

flight medics. Their responsibility is to care
for those with mild to moderate injuries.
Attached to an AE unit is the CCATT -
Critical Care Air Transport Team, which
consists of a critical care physician and
nurse, and a respiratory therapist. Their


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of MCMS Physician Fall 2017

MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 1
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 2
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 3
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 4
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 5
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 6
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 7
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 8
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 9
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MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 11
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 12
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MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 18
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 19
MCMS Physician Fall 2017 - 20
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