The Response Winter 2020-2021 - 13

The philosophy of these groups is rooted in the belief that individuals who share like
problems or situations work together to understand and/or improve their situations has
been modeled for many substance use disorders, process addictions and family instability.
The members offer experience, strength and hope to its participants as well as education
and emotional support. The leaders are not paid, and membership is free. Groups may also
provide material aid and/or social advocacy. According to the Recovery Research Institute,
mutual aid support groups are beneficial and cost effective.
There are numerous emerging and growing recovery support services. Such as mutual-help
organizations like SMART Recovery, LifeRing, Narcotics Anonymous, sober living homes,
recovery community centers, educational supports (e.g., recovery high schools, collegiate
recovery programs), recovery centers and alternative peer groups, each supportive group
is an extension of the formidable process and approach to recovery from the framework of
Alcoholics Anonymous. Additionally, research studies illustrate self-identification of one's
own recovery is an important part of reconciling one's own problem and moving to living
in the solution. Through the support of mutual aid support groups, the gigantic step is
possible with the help and support of peers.
Continued on page 14
SOURCE

YEAR

DEFINITION

Center for
Substance Abuse
Treatment (CSAT)

2005

Recovery from alcohol and drug problems is a process of change through
which an individual achieves abstinence and improved health, wellness
and quality of life.

American Society of
Addiction Medicine
(ASAM)

2005

A patient is in a " state of recovery " when he or sh has reached a state of
physical and psychological health such that his/her abstinence from dependency-producing drugs is complete and comfortable.

Betty Ford Institute

2006

A voluntarily maintained lifestyle characterized by sobriety, personal
health and citizenship.

2007

Recovery is the experience (a process and a sustained status) through
which individuals, families, and communities impacted by severe alcohol
and other drug (AOD) problems utilize internal and external resources to
voluntarily resolve these problems, heal the wounds inflicted by AOD-related problems, actively manage their continued vulnerability to such
problems, and develop a healthy, productive, and meaningful life.

UK Drug Policy
Commission

2008

The process of recovery from problematic substance use is characterized
by voluntarily sustained control over substance use which maximizes
health and wellbeing and participation in the rights, roles and responsibilities of society.

Scottish
Government

2008

A process through which an individual is enabled to move on from their
drug use, towards a drug-free life as an active and contributing member
of society.

SAMSHA

2001

Recovery from mental disorders and substance use disorders is a process
of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness,
live a self directed life, and strive to reach their full potential.

American Society of
Addiction Medicine
(ASAM)

2013

A process of sustained action that addresses the biological, psychological,
social and spiritual disturbances inherent in addiction.

Kelly and Hoeppner

2014

Recovery is a dynamic process characterized by increasingly stable
remission resulting in and supported by increased recovery capital and
enhanced quality of life.

Recovery Research
Institute
Addiction-ARY

2017

The process of improved physical, psychological, and social well-being
and health after having suffered from a substance-related condition.

William L. White

Definitions of Recovery (J.F. Kelly & Hoeppner, 2014)
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The Response Winter 2020-2021

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