Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021 - 32

SLOPED TOP DISCONNECTS ENHANCE SANITATION
In addition to the enclosure material, your operating environment will
determine if you need a motor disconnect with a flat or sloped-top
design. Some motor disconnects feature a curved profile, which
eliminates standing water and minimizes contaminant buildup in food
processing and cleanroom environments. These motor disconnects are
available in both metallic (stainless steel) and non-metallic enclosures.
One example is the CDS Series, the industry's
first
curved,
non-metallic motor disconnect. With a curved profile and chemically
resistant thermoplastic enclosure, these units are rated to UL Type 4X
and IP69K to withstand frequent washdown and high-pressure water.
Also, NSF-certified, the series satisfies most line disconnect
requirements with a 30A and 25HP rating. (For more information about
sloped- and curved-top stainless steel and polymer motor disconnects,
see our sidebar.)
DETERMINING A DISCONNECT'S ELECTRICAL DESIGN
Open any catalog of motor disconnect switches, and you may be
overwhelmed by all the different electrical options. Does your
disconnect need to be fusible? Is it a 1Ø or 3Ø switch requirement?
What HP and voltage are needed? Do you need an installed pilot
device? The list could go on and on-and for good reason. Nowadays,
motor disconnects increasingly have to meet challenging electrical or
installation requirements, and in many cases, you may need a
specialized switch to meet those requirements.
As you configure your disconnect, it's important to keep the following
electrical options in mind:
* Fusible or non-fusible. Your application will likely determine if the
switch should be a fusible or non-fusible type. Fusible switches have a
fuse provision in the switch and enclosure assembly, enabling you to
open and close the circuit while providing overcurrent protection.
Non-fusible switches do not have an integral fuse option and provide no
circuit protection. Quite simply, does your need require fuse protection
at the switch, or is there upstream protection to eliminate this need at
the switch? MENNEKES offers both non-fusible UL508 or fusible UL98
MENNEKES® 277 Fairfield Road, Fairfield, NJ 07004
T: 800-882-7584
F: 973-882-5585
E: info@MENNEKES.com www.MENNEKES.com
disconnects.
* Pole and throw options. Is the voltage requirement 1Ø or 3Ø? This
will determine the number of poles to match the voltage configuration
and related HP rating. Most industrial requirements use 3 pole
switches, but MENNEKES also stocks 6 pole disconnects in both
non-metallic and stainless enclosures. These are a perfect disconnect
means for two-speed or reversing motors. Off-the-shelf availability and
compact size makes them especially useful for motor control
applications. As an added option, we offer 6 pole double throw
disconnects with a center OFF position to transfer loads from one
power source to another.
* Pilot device. Do you need a pilot device as well as a disconnect in the
same enclosure? Normally a separate enclosure is required to mount
these devices. With MENNEKES disconnects, you can customize your
disconnect and add a pushbutton, selector switch or pilot light in the
same enclosure. We stock many 22.5 mm and 30 mm pilot devices, or
we can assemble to your specifications.
Stainless Steel
Sloped Roof
Disconnect Rated
NEMA 4X
VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3
32
http://www.MENNEKES.com

Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021

Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021 - 1
Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021 - 2
Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021 - 3
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