Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021 - 4

THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO PROXIMITY
AND PHOTOELECTRIC SENSORS FOR
AUTOMOTIVE STAMP AND WELD
THREE MAJOR CHALLENGES IN STAMP AND WELD
Stamp and weld applications cover everything from car doors and
door frames to chassis, settings for mirrors, and more. Stamping
involves pressing (and sometimes blanking) sheet metal into a desired
form with giant dies, while welding is the process of fusing two metal
parts together using heat generated by electrical arcing.
Since the equipment involved in these applications is quite
expensive, any downtime that might occur carries high costs as well.
For this reason, manufacturers seek out ways to maximize uptime and
minimize wear and tear on the machinery. Let's take a look at the three
overarching concerns in this segment of the automotive industry.
1. Stamp and weld equipment costs a lot of money.
Nearly all of the equipment involved in stamp and weld is very
expensive. A die responsible for stamping a car roof might exceed a
million dollars. Transfer equipment (which moves dies and material in
and out) is also a huge investment. If stamp and weld equipment is
down or idle, there are major financial ramifications in terms of costly
repairs or wasted production time.
2. Die wear and tear can lead to poorly formed parts.
The automotive parts created in the stamp and weld process need to
be perfectly formed pieces of sheet metal. Once the die starts to wear,
its ability to stamp with complete accuracy starts to diminish. For this
reason, it's essential for manufacturers to constantly monitor height,
seating, evenness of material, and many other factors.
3. Fast-moving equipment can collide with other equipment
The transfer equipment typically moves at high speeds and can wipe
CANADIAN AUTOMATION
out costly investments if not guided properly. For instance, if the motion
of the transfer equipment and a nearby robotic arm aren't meticulously
coordinated, the former could smash an $80,000 end-effector on the
latter.
The solution to all of the challenges described above is almost always
sensors. Although it's possible to take care of some of these needs with
a vision system, sensors are much more cost-effective. For example,
sensors can be situated in a multitude of locations within and around the
die equipment, detecting wear on the die, part presence inside the die,
and other things.
When you start to hit dies together and you're stamping what needs
to be an absolutely perfectly formed piece of sheet metal, once the die
starts to wear, you start stamping defective parts. The in-die sensors
monitor height, seating, material, evenness of material, etc.
VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3
4
https://automation.omron.com/en/ca/blog/proximity-sensors-for-automotive-and-welding https://automation.omron.com/en/ca/

Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021

Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021 - 1
Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021 - 2
Automation Canada Machine Safety Issue May 2021 - 3
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