Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 11

T

he world of shipping is undergoing a sea change with consolidation, larger ships and economic
pressures. And that's just the
water side. On land, the same financial
pressures await.
So what role can a port play in solving
these broader supply chain issues? A lot.
Take the Port of Halifax, for instance. In
the midst of its master planning, the port
is working with the local municipality and
transportation services company CN to
solve another issue: truck traffic in the city.
"The port is a major economic generator for the city and the region," said Paul
MacIsaac, senior vice president, Halifax
(NS) Port Authority. "We're a key cog in
the overall supply chain. It's important that
our shipping lines are in agreement and
concur with our plans, that our terminal
operators are in a position to operate the
infrastructure we would build, that the land
side would be ready so that cargo moves fluidly. It's important that it's all coordinated
so that we don't end up with something that
isn't effective."
That same emphasis on working together
is what has happened over the last 18
months at the Port of Mobile (AL), said
Dan Bresolin, assistant vice president, international sales for transportation company
CN. "We have successfully worked very
close with the Alabama State Port Authority
in conjunction with APMT to develop a
comprehensive inland transportation plan
to support the new Intermodal Container
Transfer Facility that was opened on
May 1, 2016."
But supply chain leadership - and the
important role that ports can and should
play in it - extends well beyond master planning or an expansion.
"Ports are beginning to realize the crucial importance of working together with
their supply chains to boost everyone's efficiency and trade flow," said Rick Blasgen,
chair of the Federal Advisory Committee on
Supply Chain Competitiveness and president and CEO of the Council of Supply
Chain Management Professionals. "They
are natural allies with all other stakeholders in the broader supply chain since they
are a node. They are a very important part
that enables global trade."

"The port is a major
economic generator for
the city and the region.
We're a key cog in the
overall supply chain."
-Paul MacIsaac, Senior Vice President,
Halifax (NS) Port Authority

In many ways, it means getting into the
businesses that operate within the port,
whether it is terminal operators, cargo owners or transportation companies.
"The port is a key conduit within the
shipping and transportation industry and
must be aligned with the challenges and
opportunities of the gateway," Bresolin said.
"Our customers' expectations are focused
on overall supply chain costs, fluidity and
reliability of the gateway. That includes
multiple segments, such as container handling, empty and loaded container storage,
warehousing, truck and rail transportation."
It is not a perfect system, to be sure. But
several innovative programs and philosophies show how it can be done.

A Focus on Collaboration
When the Port of Oakland (CA) wanted
to create a port efficiency task force, it
assigned seats to all of those participating in the first meeting. "We weren't sure
everyone in the room would speak to each
other," said Beth Frisher, the port's business development manager. Fast forward
18 months: "It's congenial. They're focused
on collaborating. Task force members have
worked in groups to develop extended hours
for marine terminal operators by gathering
feedback and conducting surveys. That's a
real example of how we use the task force
to inform and to gather inputs and requirements across the supply chain, to give input
to the entity that has to execute."
That doesn't mean it has been easy. When
the port wanted to provide visibility to truck
turn times, the port took a leadership role,

gathering data and creating a standard
definition of turn times. "Not all stakeholders thought it was a great idea, and some
were reticent," said Frisher. "Knowing the
importance of transparency and the power
of data, we moved ahead and installed
Bluetooth readers throughout the port complex and at terminal gates. Now, we publish
- in real time - trucker wait times. We were
focused on metrics that were trusted and
that people had confidence in."
The marine terminal that was most concerned about the data being made public -
because it had the highest turn times - now
has the shortest.
"If there are two words that sum up
what we are focused on as a port authority, they would be cargo velocity," Frisher
said. "Velocity is going to cut costs down for
everyone. That's been our main goal, and
we can see impacts in several key initiatives that our marine terminal operators
have implemented. It's a whole range of
stakeholders doing this."

A Role to Play
Finding common ground takes work,
but ports have something of a bully pulpit.
Since most are public entities, that places a
certain level of focus on the overall benefits. "We're seen as an honest broker in discussions," MacIsaac said. "We don't have
a pure business focus, but an economic
generation focus. We're a key element in
those discussions. Depending upon the
type of customers, the port authority and
its quasi-governmental role is helpful at
opening doors."
Blasgen said that ports are an area of
"big focus" for the committee, for the
potential that port efficiency can bring
to overall supply chain improvements.
"We've made some recommendations
that help cargo owners, ports and terminal operators to have broader visibility in
the cargo movement. That helps everyone plan and be more efficient. How do
we help smaller ports capture these benefits as well? We've shared best practices
that other key ports have implemented,
together with their stakeholders, that have
been shown to optimize their ability to
use their existing resources to move cargo
faster and more efficiently. The goal is to

SPRING 2017 * WWW.AAPASEAPORTS.COM

11


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Ports’ Power as Conveners
FAST Act Impact
Following Up on the Funding Trail
Infrastructure Coordination: Competing Globally, Acting Locally
A Digital Vision of Leadership: Using Technology to Improve the Supply Chain in Los Angeles
XXV Latin American Congress of Ports
Every American, Every Day is Impacted by Port Activities
LED Lighting – The Right Choice for Ports?
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - into
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Ports’ Power as Conveners
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - FAST Act Impact
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Following Up on the Funding Trail
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Infrastructure Coordination: Competing Globally, Acting Locally
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - A Digital Vision of Leadership: Using Technology to Improve the Supply Chain in Los Angeles
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - XXV Latin American Congress of Ports
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Every American, Every Day is Impacted by Port Activities
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - LED Lighting – The Right Choice for Ports?
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 34
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 44
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 45
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