Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 25

up to two weeks ahead of a vessel's arrival
at the port.
"Digital solutions that enable supply
chain partners to receive a ship's cargo
information well in advance of arrival, like
with the digital portal we are envisioning
with GE Transportation, are a critical key to
optimizing U.S. cargo efficiency and trade
competitiveness," said Gene Seroka, executive director of the Port of Los Angeles.
The pilot project will utilize GE
Transportation Predix, an industrial
cloud-based platform, with data from U.S.
Customs and Border Protection, two shipping lines and one marine terminal operator
to populate a portal that can be accessed by
beneficial cargo owners, freight forwarders,
trucking companies, rail companies and
others involved in the movement of cargo
through the port and beyond.
"Hard infrastructure is our comfort
zone," said Chris Chase, marketing manager at the Port of Los Angeles. "This is a
new venture and a new direction for us."
Currently, BCOs and others only
receive information about the placement
and content of containers 48-72 hours in
advance of a vessel's arrival in port. The Los
Angeles-GE Transportation pilot seeks to
make that data available 10-14 days before
a vessel arrives.
The pilot also seeks to make accessing
shipping information more efficient for data
users. Currently, a truck dispatcher in southern California may have to visit as many as
20 different websites to get information
about containers moving through the port.
This pilot project seeks to streamline the
user experience by creating a single portal
that houses data from multiple sources.
Right now, a user "may have a clear
picture of one part of the system but not
the whole," said Seth Bodnar, chief digital
officer of GE Transportation and president
of GE Digital Solutions. The pilot project,
which is expected to launch in either late
first quarter or early second quarter of this
year, seeks to provide that bigger picture
look at goods moving through a terminal
at the Port of Los Angeles.
However, the aim of the pilot is to test
and refine this concept with a goal of

"We will likely see the
entire supply chain
have some of the slack
taken out."
- Seth Bodnar, GE Transportation

digitizing shipping information in a new
way for the all the terminals at the port
and, ultimately, the larger supply chain.
And while the pilot project is not seeking to change specific industry practices
to improve goods movement, the partners involved have chosen to participate
because they believe that the project will
ultimately lead to process improvements
that increase efficiency.
"We will likely see the entire supply
chain have some of the slack taken out,"
said GE Transportation's Bodnar. "We
can drive great reliability and efficiency."
"The cargo owners themselves
expressed that as the handoffs happen between supply chain service
providers there are gaps. We are trying to fill those," said Seroka at GE
Digital's Minds+Machines conference
in December 2016.
The input of cargo owners and other
stakeholders was critical to the decision
to launch this pilot project. During the
cargo slowdown of late 2014 and early
2015, the Port of Los Angeles brought
stakeholders together and asked for their
feedback about optimizing the supply
chain.
"One of the drumbeats we heard was
'we need more data, better access and a
clean portal to it,'" said Phillip Sanfield,
director of media relations at the Port of
Los Angeles.
Another inspiration for the pilot project came when CMA CGM's Benjamin
Franklin, an 18,000-TEU ship, called
at the port at the end of 2015. The port
worked to compile data manually to take
advantage of the two-week transit time of
the ship. The port then asked itself, can
we digitize that process?

Turning those broad ideas into a specific reality has required getting a lot of
parties to the table.
"We have been capitalizing on relationships we have to get buy-in," said
Port of Los Angeles' Chase. "Our side
is being the convener."
GE's Bodnar pointed out that the
project is bringing together more than
150 data fields from disparate users.
"The cooperation has been outstanding," said Chase.
GE's experience in working within
industry has been a key part of the success to date. While this is the company's
first project specifically focused on seaports, GE Transportation has done a lot
of work with other types of terminals
and has "been in the rail space for more
than a century," Bodnar said. "We are
expanding from our core rail expertise."
"GE has been a strong partner," Chase
said, citing specifically the company's
ability to keep the data secure and anonymized. Portal users will not have access
to all the information housed there, only
the data relevant to their business needs.
The users of the data will ultimately
prove critical in how the pilot project is
refined and expanded. The port plans on
using a variety of formats to seek feedback on the data portal.
GE Transportation is interested in the
reactions the pilot project will evoke in
its users, recognizing that many times
users will be better able to articulate
what is missing or what would be helpful
after they have had interactions with an
early iteration of a data portal.
"Is this information helping you
plan and run your business more efficiently?" is the question that GE's
Bodnar will seek to have pilot project
users answer.
Ultimately, both the Port of Los
Angeles and GE Transportation hope
that the project will help increase "predictability and reliability in the supply
chain," according to the Port of Los
Angeles' Seroka. "To raise our level of
trade competitiveness on the global scale
is of great importance to our nation."  ●

SPRING 2017 * WWW.AAPASEAPORTS.COM

25


http://WWW.AAPASEAPORTS.COM

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Ports’ Power as Conveners
FAST Act Impact
Following Up on the Funding Trail
Infrastructure Coordination: Competing Globally, Acting Locally
A Digital Vision of Leadership: Using Technology to Improve the Supply Chain in Los Angeles
XXV Latin American Congress of Ports
Every American, Every Day is Impacted by Port Activities
LED Lighting – The Right Choice for Ports?
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - into
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Ports’ Power as Conveners
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - FAST Act Impact
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Following Up on the Funding Trail
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Infrastructure Coordination: Competing Globally, Acting Locally
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - A Digital Vision of Leadership: Using Technology to Improve the Supply Chain in Los Angeles
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - XXV Latin American Congress of Ports
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Every American, Every Day is Impacted by Port Activities
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - LED Lighting – The Right Choice for Ports?
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 34
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 44
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 47
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