Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 22

get it from," Stubbs said. "There are not
a lot of places around the world that can
say that."

Rail in Alabama
Each day, rails run pulp between the
port in Mobile and a nearby manufacturing
facility where toilet paper is made. And yes,
that rail run is part of the port's business
services. The Alabama State Port Authority,
Terminal Railway - Alabama State Docks
(TASD) has long been part of the port's
business operations. In all, the port's rail
line includes about 75 miles, eight locomotives and a staff of 100. The rail line
operates on its own tracks within the port
and using rights-of-way on other rail lines.

Regardless, it has given the port a leg up
on various products, including coal, much
of it mined from Northern Alabama; import
and export agricultural products; and steel.
The railway is the largest port-owned railway in the country and offers immediate
access to five Class 1 railroads and two short
line railroads.
Having rail facilities gives the port - and,
more importantly, its customers - an option
for shipping.
"Rail is one of several transportation
options, and amongst some commodities,
the cost is cheaper," said Cliff Melton, general manager of the railway. "It helps that
we have the connection that we do to the
other railroads and that we are at the port's

TAKING A NICHE TO AN EXPERTISE
Expanding into a new area - or growing
in an area in which the port already operates - may seem like uncharted waters.
But others have navigated these channels
before and offer tips.
* Openness pays off. "Be forthright
and open with everything you do in
the process with your community," said
David Stubbs, director of Properties
and Environmental Compliance for the
Jacksonville Port Authority. "They are
going to make or break your ability to
participate." When the Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission (FERC) held
a public hearing before a third LNG
facility was added, the meeting was completed in 24 minutes.
* Maintain relationships with everyone involved. "You've got to work hard
to earn trust at every level," Stubbs said.
"It really smooths the path."
* Stay flexible. "That's one of the things
that ports struggle with: being flexible
enough to adjust to variability," said Blair
Garcia, PPM®, vice president and U.S.
director for Maritime Practice at WSP
USA. "Having that flexibility will allow
you to capture those niches, run with it
and become that industry leader."
* Pay attention to new and evolving
cargo types and offer efficiencies.
Garcia said one evolving cargo type
is wind turbine parts. "Offshore wind

22

AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE

farm projects will require a location
for pre-assembly at a port facility and
transferred out onto a structure over
water. That's a whole different type
of facility than a project cargo import
terminal."
* Create a narrative "that people can
get behind," said Sean Strawbridge,
CEO of the Port of Corpus Christi.
When selling the benefits of energy,
he touts the financial implications to
the national economy and the security
implications that come from energy
independence.
* Be willing to invest, but don't buy
into the idea of "build it and they
will come," Strawbridge said. "There's
a lot of risk there, particularly when
using public funds. We have a fiduciary
responsibility to the public as stewards
of these assets to be as responsible and
thoughtful as we could be."
* Embrace what you know. "Know
what you're good at and expand upon it,"
Strawbridge said. "Don't try to be something you're not." One of Strawbridge's
first acts at the port was to kill development of a container port. "We're not
going to have the scale of other container
ports in the region, such as the Port of
Houston. A truck can be rerouted; pipelines can't. I like that stickiness of being
an energy port."

beck and call. We can compete where short
rails and big rail lines can't. While we make
money, we're more of an asset to the port."
It also rounds out the options available
for shippers. "There's a lot of barge traffic
on the Mobile River and two interstate systems, but the rail connections are fantastic
here," Melton said. "Our customers want
the best rates, so they have that option."
While TASD has been in operation for
more than 90 years, it continues to grow.
Rail infrastructure investments and overall
cargo growth at the port have contributed
to the TASD's growth, but Melton thinks,
in part, it is also due to the railroad's turnaround in safety. "The Port Authority put
the resources into fixing the track structure to make it a world-class railroad," he
said. Because several chemical shippers
reside just north of the railyard, safety
is paramount.
The safety culture recently earned the
rail line two President's Awards from the
American Short Line and Regional Railroad
Association (ASLRRA) for Most Hours of
Injury-Free Operation (zero accidents in
a calendar year) and Best Safety Rate for
150,000-250,000 Man Hours worked in
Calendar Year 2016. The TASD repeated
those safety achievements in 2017.
Investments have been made to improve
the environmental impact as well. Three
of the eight locomotives have converted to
smart technology to reduce air emissions.
The Authority is scheduled to convert the
fourth locomotive this year. "Safety, reducing our railroad's emissions and customer
service drive our initiatives on the Terminal
Railway," said Jimmy Lyons, director and
chief executive officer. "It's a team effort
and we've got an excellent team."

Energy in Corpus Christi
Perhaps it is no surprise that the Port of
Corpus Christi excels at energy. The Texas
oil business has been around almost as long
as the port has. "For a long time, the refineries were the ports' primary customer base,"
said Sean Strawbridge, the port's CEO. "It
wasn't until the last decade that we saw a
major change of fortune."
That change came with the shale revolution, opening up another "oil" boom to the
port. "What makes ports successful often is
purely location," Strawbridge said. The U.S.
is now one of the largest energy producers in the world and Texas is certainly the



Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Business Boom: Ports Report Record-Setting 2017
One-Sided Investments – U.S. Ports Call for Federal Support of Long-Term Infrastructure Development
Ship Shape: Ports Navigate Their Niches to Find Their Areas of Expertise
Finding the Right Mix – A Latin American Port’s Perspective
Dredging Demands
Water Resources System Integral to Competitiveness of US Economy and Security
Port-Based Welfare Provision: It’s About Collaboration
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Intro
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Business Boom: Ports Report Record-Setting 2017
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - One-Sided Investments – U.S. Ports Call for Federal Support of Long-Term Infrastructure Development
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Ship Shape: Ports Navigate Their Niches to Find Their Areas of Expertise
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Finding the Right Mix – A Latin American Port’s Perspective
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Dredging Demands
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 28
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Water Resources System Integral to Competitiveness of US Economy and Security
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Port-Based Welfare Provision: It’s About Collaboration
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 40
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 44
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 46
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 47
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 48
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 49
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0417
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0317
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0416
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0316
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0415
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0215
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0115
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com