Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 29

September's Hurricane Irma came
toward the end of the West Turning Basin
project. "We had substantially completed
the project in September. When Irma was
approaching, the contractor was authorized
to stay in port," said Musser. That turned out
to be a lucky break. The port suffered some
shoaling. Musser said, "The Corps was able
to quickly reprogram some funds, and the
contractor was able to finish up the Turning
Basin project and then jump on the shoaling, quickly bringing Port Canaveral back
to post-Hurricane Matthew conditions."
Musser said the port works closely with
the Corps on many coastal projects including beach renourishment and sand bypass
projects: "Since Irma, we've established
weekly calls with the Corps and local partners just to stay abreast of changes. That has
worked out well and will continue."

A Dredger's Perspective
Chicago-based, 128-year-old Great
Lakes Dredge & Dock is the largest dredger
in the United States. GLDD executive Bill
Hanson said, "We do it all - port deepenings, coastal restorations and beach renourishment, wetlands, island construction."
Hanson said dialogue between ports and
dredging companies has proven very effective in recent years. "Harbor Maintenance
Trust Fund reform was a national issue.
We are up to 72 percent of target [freeing
up the trust fund money for its intended
use]. That's something the AAPA, ports,
waterway users and dredgers can really
celebrate," he said.
"Making sure port projects are understood at the Congressional level and in the
State House is critical," Hanson said. Ports
that focus on job creation and other economic benefits smooth the way for projects.
It is important that ports have somebody
at the table to push through issues. "These
projects are massive and sometimes controversial and it is not easy to make them
happen," said Hanson.

It also helps when ports bring money to
the table. "It may be the only way. It shows
the Corps the port is serious. The Corps has
their job and they work hard at it, but their
responsibilities go beyond port business. It
takes a local partner to be fully engaged to
get a project done."
Asked about beneficial use considerations, Hanson said it is a point of pride for
the industry that stakeholders are working
together. On the Mississippi, for example,
"roughly 60 percent (20.8 million cubic
yards) of all dredge in the Southwest Pass
area were beneficially used last year."
One of the best things ports are doing
these days, Hanson said, is "... to engage
communities and contractors early. Call the
contracting community, tell them what you
are trying to accomplish, describe unique
environmental or scheduling concerns, and
let them come up with alternatives to open
up the scope, or to get more bidders." Clear
expectations result in better schedules and
pricing that reflects the work that has to
be done.
Once a dredging contract is signed things
usually go smoothly. Nevertheless, issues do
crop up, such as when material encountered
isn't what was anticipated. "Then there can
be delays as we change out equipment,"
said Hanson.
"The bigger issue," said Hanson, "is complying with ever-changing environmental
standards, which can quickly drive up costs.
Dredging is expensive. Ports that study the
environmental issues a little longer and
harder may be able to remove some of the
restrictions and save money."
Hanson recalled an issue many years ago
when high PCB levels in Newark Bay shut
down dredging for several years. Other
factors that can impede a project include
weather and seasonality.
Hanson summed up dredging: "Projects
go well when ports plan, then have a Plan
B, and a Plan C, and sometimes even a
Plan D." ●

"Making sure port projects are understood at the
Congressional level and in the State House is critical."

Discover
Your
Financial
Compass
David Miller
Managing Director
millerd@pfm.com
PFM Financial Advisors LLC
300 S. Orange Avenue
Suite 1170
Orlando, FL 32801
407.648.2208
pfm.com

-Bill Hanson, Great Lakes Dredge & Dock
For important disclosure information
go to pfm.com/disclosures

SPRING 2018
* WWW.AAPASEAPORTS.COM
884721_Public.indd
1
01/11/17 29
11:16 PM


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Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Business Boom: Ports Report Record-Setting 2017
One-Sided Investments – U.S. Ports Call for Federal Support of Long-Term Infrastructure Development
Ship Shape: Ports Navigate Their Niches to Find Their Areas of Expertise
Finding the Right Mix – A Latin American Port’s Perspective
Dredging Demands
Water Resources System Integral to Competitiveness of US Economy and Security
Port-Based Welfare Provision: It’s About Collaboration
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Intro
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Business Boom: Ports Report Record-Setting 2017
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - One-Sided Investments – U.S. Ports Call for Federal Support of Long-Term Infrastructure Development
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Ship Shape: Ports Navigate Their Niches to Find Their Areas of Expertise
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Finding the Right Mix – A Latin American Port’s Perspective
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Dredging Demands
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 28
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Water Resources System Integral to Competitiveness of US Economy and Security
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Port-Based Welfare Provision: It’s About Collaboration
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 40
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 44
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 46
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 47
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 48
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 49
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