Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 32

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GUEST VIEWPOINT

Port-Based Welfare Provision:
It's About Collaboration
By Jason Zuidema, Executive
Director, North American
Maritime Ministry Association

I

n ports around North America, more than 70,000 Christmas
gifts were given this past Christmas. A warm hat and gloves,
some toiletries, perhaps a bit of chocolate - a small gift to
show seafarers far from home that they are not alone during
the holiday season.
But that gift is only one of the many ways kindness is shown.
Most seafarers' welfare centers also give free or low-cost transport
to local shopping and welcome seafarers' to a center where they
can relax, use free Wi-Fi or sit back for a friendly conversation with
staff and volunteers.
But how do seafarers' centers do it? Where do they find the
resources for all this generosity?
Visitors sometimes assume that seafarers' centers are funded by
governmental programs or a single benefactor with deep and generous pockets. Those situations are extraordinarily rare. Despite
appearing to be one seamless organization from the outside, many
partners typically contribute to the operation and support of a
single seafarers' center, including both institutions and individuals.
When it comes to seafarers' welfare in the port environment, the
service provided arises from a web or a network for the benefit
of seafarers.
Seafarers' center board members often represent stakeholders
from shipping companies, unions, supporting faith communities,
Deacon Paul
Rosenblum
delivers Christmas
gifts to seafarers
in the Port of
Charleston in
December 2017.

and even port authorities. In a recent continent-wide study,
NAMMA found that port authority involvement with seafarers'
centers is one of the biggest factors in encouraging others in the
maritime community to collaborate and contribute. Partnership
between centers and port authorities, in other words, is essential.
Sometimes it is a technical challenge to send delegates from a
public body onto the boards of a local charity, but there is usually a
way to work out that representation even if it takes some creativity.
And port authorities have so much more to offer beyond sending
representatives to a center's board of directors. Seafarers' welfare
workers frequently include chaplains, ship visitors, and staff - both
paid and volunteer in each category. These individuals bring an
incredible diversity of backgrounds and true passion to benefit
seafarers' welfare. Sometimes they come because a family member is or was at sea, parlaying a personal connection into service
to strangers; even more often, seafarers' center volunteers and
workers have no previous connection to the sea. They might have
a friend who volunteers, heard about the work in their religious
community, or just wandered past the center by chance. In any
case, the team of a seafarers' center is vital to its success.
Some ports even enjoy multiple seafarers' centers, created at
different times and often by different church traditions, for the
benefit of seafarers. Today they most often collaborate directly,
sometimes serving different parts of the port, feeding on each
other's strengths and filling in where there is weakness.
Yet collaboration is more than just about efficiency. As the seafaring life itself is typified by social isolation, so also do people working
in seafarers' welfare charities - often in port areas far from other
community organizations - feel isolated. Staff and volunteers find
that working together makes sense for the work itself but also for the
encouragement that it provides. It is truly rewarding to see people
from different generations and backgrounds coming together for the
common cause of welcoming the seafarer.

In exploring new and exciting partnerships,
seafarers' centers can bridge the gaps in
seafarers' lives as global shipping changes
from generation to generation.
32

AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE



Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Business Boom: Ports Report Record-Setting 2017
One-Sided Investments – U.S. Ports Call for Federal Support of Long-Term Infrastructure Development
Ship Shape: Ports Navigate Their Niches to Find Their Areas of Expertise
Finding the Right Mix – A Latin American Port’s Perspective
Dredging Demands
Water Resources System Integral to Competitiveness of US Economy and Security
Port-Based Welfare Provision: It’s About Collaboration
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Intro
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Business Boom: Ports Report Record-Setting 2017
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - One-Sided Investments – U.S. Ports Call for Federal Support of Long-Term Infrastructure Development
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Ship Shape: Ports Navigate Their Niches to Find Their Areas of Expertise
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Finding the Right Mix – A Latin American Port’s Perspective
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Dredging Demands
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 28
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Water Resources System Integral to Competitiveness of US Economy and Security
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Port-Based Welfare Provision: It’s About Collaboration
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 40
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2018 - 42
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