Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 11

economic development. Mi'gmaq Chief
David Peter-Paul commented, "We are
pleased that the Port of Belledune has
reached out to the First Nation Communities
and recognizes our desire to participate in
contributing to the prosperity of the region."
Caron said, across Canada, aboriginal
leaders are increasingly critical to port
success. "It is so important to gain social
license, particularly for a rural port," said
Caron. The Port of Belledune is a diverse
deep-water port with a book of business that
dominates the sparsely populated region.
Caron said, "Our projects are some of the
most important in the area, and we want
to ensure they are right for the region. We
rely on our stakeholders."
Those stakeholders have long memories and strong opinions. A few years ago
Bennett Environmental Inc. built a thermal
oxidizer facility in a Belledune industrial
park - essentially a hazardous waste incinerator for U.S.-origin contaminated soil.
Public outcry, even in a region with doubledigit unemployment, prevented the plant
from ever opening.
The port is currently assessing the potential for a rail-served oil export terminal.
Caron said, "We have put in processes to
ensure all stakeholders are engaged and
aware. We spend a lot of time developing
relationships and presenting information.
We want to facilitate and act as a conduit
for port business, but not represent private
industry." He added, "The private sector
is important to port success, but without
the public sector, projects can be brought
to a halt."

Allied in Houston
Simultaneously enhancing port and community results is a top priority for the Port of
Houston Authority, according to Executive
Director Roger Guenther, who credits good
stakeholder relationships with his port's
recent successes.
Houston's customers provide the foundation for most projects. "In order for us
to provide facilities for them to grow and
succeed, we have to collaborate regularly,"
said Guenther. Customers have helped the
port bring jobs and other economic activity
to Texas for more than a century, helping
contribute roughly 16 percent of Texas' total
gross domestic product.

"The private sector
is important to port
success, but without
the public sector,
projects can be
brought to a halt."
-Denis Caron, President & CEO,
Port of Belledune

Today, along the U.S. Gulf Coast, there
is tremendous movement in the energy
sector. Guenther described a very bright
future for the plastic resin business, in particular, and noted that the port is working
with the industry to plan out its facilities
ahead of the demand curve. Port of Houston
recently hosted its second Synthetic Resin
Symposium for supply chain professionals, beneficial cargo owners and exporters,
focusing on the resin supply chain, market
demand, production and manufacturing,
infrastructure impact and capacity. The
symposium highlighted port and industry
interdependencies and emerging opportunities, such as those for bagging and
packaging resin, and helped equip the port
and business community with new insights
that will help the region retain and grow
its resin volumes.
Also indispensable to the port's success,
according to Guenther, is its workforce.
"Labor has made us very successful through
the years. We have an excellent partnership for progress. They provide reliable and
consistent performance," he said.
But a conversation about the port's
stakeholders wouldn't be complete without mentioning the regional community.
"Continuous outreach to the community
in many different forms is vital. We have to
make sure they are aware of what is going
on and find out what their concerns are
to help us coexist in a friendly manner,"
said Guenther.
In Houston, the advancement of port
projects is supported by a well-conceived
strategic plan.
Stakeholder outreach is a time-consuming
and expensive endeavor. When asked where

he draws the line, Guenther said, "You do the
things that are critical to success. If you draw
a line you won't achieve the port's mission
and drive prosperity." He said that whether
the port is engaging students or elected
officials or a dredging partner, outreach
in all areas has to be a priority. "You can't
be successful without it. We acknowledge,
listen, and meld concerns into decisions,"
said Guenther. A few years ago, collaboration with stakeholders about the effect of
a dredged materials disposal site led, for
example, to a change in the disposal location.
Chad Carson is the vice president of
economic development for the Economic
Alliance Houston Port Region, an organization that aims to grow and market the
regional economy through economic development, public policy, workforce development and quality of life initiatives.
Carson said the Houston Ship Channel
area is home to one of the world's most influential energy corridors and trade ports in
the world. "The port industry reverberates
worldwide. It is a great resource to attract
or expand business, and to keep people and
production moving in the region. It helps
continue the area's world-class cachet," said
Carson. He said that, in addition to being
an influential partner in marketing, helping
convince folks of the business merits of the
region, the Port of Houston also helps shore
up the region's business climate, providing
ongoing enhancements to transportation
infrastructure and mobility, and creating
opportunities for workforce and industry.
In the last decade, the Economic Alliance
- representing 18 member communities, the
Port of Houston Authority, Harris County,
and more than 230 private industries -
reports that it has supported more than 40
successful projects providing 4,400 new jobs
and over $5.5 billion in capital investment
to the region.

Ice Recreationalists
in Green Bay
The Port of Green Bay in Wisconsin,
which ices up for a few months each winter,
turns into a temporary winter wonderland
for recreational ice fishers, snowmobilers
and others. This past winter, the possibility
of breaking a channel through ice for future
business necessitated some unprecedented
outreach by the port.

SUMMER 2017 * WWW.AAPASEAPORTS.COM

11


http://WWW.AAPASEAPORTS.COM

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Stakeholders: A Seaport’s Secret Resource
Why Ports Need Allies: Maintaining a Working Waterfront Takes a Network of Supporters
The Next Generation of Leaders — Succession Planning Provides Security, Guidance for Future
Port Security — An Exercise in Partnerships
Lessons From the Past: A Renewed Commentary on Port Security
Cyber Security: What Port Authorities Need to Know
Tomorrow’s Leaders Need More Than On-the-Job Training
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Intro
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Stakeholders: A Seaport’s Secret Resource
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Why Ports Need Allies: Maintaining a Working Waterfront Takes a Network of Supporters
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - The Next Generation of Leaders — Succession Planning Provides Security, Guidance for Future
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 20
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Port Security — An Exercise in Partnerships
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 24
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Lessons From the Past: A Renewed Commentary on Port Security
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Cyber Security: What Port Authorities Need to Know
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Tomorrow’s Leaders Need More Than On-the-Job Training
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 44
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 46
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - outsert1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - outsert2
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