Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 16

Photo Courtesy: Port of Palm Beach

Photo Courtesy: Port of Everett

Port of Everett is a medium-sized niche port that strives for a
balanced waterfront.
Everett is a medium-sized niche port that
strives to be a balanced waterfront. Reardanz
explains, "We don't have a ton of land, and
we're not going after the consumer container
business. We have a very focused business
plan on what cargo we do and how that benefits the greater Puget Sound region."
The concept of a balanced waterfront is
providing recreational benefits from economic gains. "Part of the waterfront is a working waterfront," Reardanz says, "and as you
move north, you get to recreational areas. The
port is also developing mixed-use property so
people can live, play and work in the same
area." He describes the port's approach thusly:
"We recognize you need an area where jobs
are created and tax base is developed so you
can support these other projects that allow
people to touch the water." Recreational areas
create a high rate of return to the community,
but no monetary return. This is precisely why
the port also pursues projects with a high rate
of monetary return.
An example of this kind of project is
modernizing the south shipping terminal.
Reardanz explains that the terminal was
originally designed to handle lumber and isn't
capable of supporting the high-end heavy
cargo the port handles now. "We do things
that don't fit neatly into containers, like agricultural equipment, industrial-sized batteries,
bridge equipment, plus Boeing's oversized
cargo. The south terminal's wharf isn't strong
enough for that cargo." In addition to adding
cranes to the wharf to accommodate larger
ships, the port is putting in 3,300 lineal feet
of rail to ameliorate congestion.
Communicating the what, why and how
of projects like this is a collaborative effort
between the port, Mayor Ray Stephanson and
the city council of Everett. "We've been able
to get out to the neighborhoods, businesses
and educational facilities to carry our message
across," says Reardanz. "Mayor Stephanson
has been a fantastic ally to us, and the city
16

AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE

The Port of Palm Beach is surrounded by some of the most
beautiful areas in South Florida, and therein lies one of the
struggles of this working waterfront.

council has been incredibly supportive of what
we're trying to do."
The appreciation for support goes both
ways, according to the mayor's office. "We
are fortunate to have such a forward-looking,
community-minded partner in the Port of
Everett," says Mayor Stephanson. "The port
is critical to our economic vitality as a region,
and is playing a key role in developing our
waterfront as an asset that our entire community can enjoy."

When Beauty and
'Concentrated Risk'
Present Challenges
The Port of Palm Beach is another selfidentified niche port that leans heavily on its
allies, though its biggest challenge is unique
among the Americas' port profiles. Executive
Director Manuel Almira is matter-of-fact
about what he calls the port's "concentrated
risk." Almira explains, "We only have one
something: one cruise ship, one container
operator, one bulk carrier, one dry dock. If
any of these leaves, I have a hole."
Business is good for Palm Beach, and the
scenery is good, too. And therein lies the
struggle of this working waterfront: "We are
surrounded by some of the most beautiful
areas in South Florida. This is where people
live with big budgets, and it's because of those
individuals and others that we at the Port of
Palm Beach take our location very seriously.
You need to be conscious of who lives around
you and the proximity of their households to
our working environment." Almira is acutely
aware of the inherent nuisances of a working waterfront to nearby luxury real estate.
"Quite honestly, I wouldn't want to live near
a crane, noise and bright lights. I recognize
that. We are extremely aware of how we can
be intrusive in households just east, south,
west and north of us," he says.
Not only do the surrounding communities wish to be unaffected by port business,

they also desire the port itself to maintain
a costly level of beautification. To this end,
the port has painted its walls with pink paint
provided by the county, planted palms and
shrubbery at the entrance and installed a
new sign. "It makes a difference," Almira
admits, adding that the Florida Department
of Transportation's expansion of a major highway that leads into the port will require all of
these changes to be redone once construction
is complete.
What's more, the port partnered with one
of its tenants to stack containers three-high
to create a container wall that shields communities' view of port operations. "It didn't
cost us anything, but it's taking valuable land
away from the port," he admits. Almira also
doesn't bring through the port odorous products or bulk materials that could fly in the
wind. "These would represent a challenge
aesthetically and could create a bad feeling."
These are concessions the port makes to keep
peace among its neighbors.
A port is an industrial site, Almira emphasizes, and the balance of functional business
and beauty could become a financial black
hole. Fortunately for the Port of Palm Beach,
it doesn't face this challenge alone. Almira
says that a ship repair yard, Lockheed Martin,
a luxury yacht repair business and an electrical company plant all receive similar concerns
and critiques from the community. "We all
know each other and try to help each other.
That's a definite plus." In addition to finding
allies in nearby businesses, local elected officials are also active in promoting "peaceful
co-existence."
Peace and prosperity aren't just buzzwords
as far as ports are concerned. The valuable
real estate upon which ports are situated
comes with major responsibility. As these
three ports have proven, collaboration with
allies across local business, government and
communities keeps both relationships and
operations running smoothly. ●



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Stakeholders: A Seaport’s Secret Resource
Why Ports Need Allies: Maintaining a Working Waterfront Takes a Network of Supporters
The Next Generation of Leaders — Succession Planning Provides Security, Guidance for Future
Port Security — An Exercise in Partnerships
Lessons From the Past: A Renewed Commentary on Port Security
Cyber Security: What Port Authorities Need to Know
Tomorrow’s Leaders Need More Than On-the-Job Training
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Intro
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Stakeholders: A Seaport’s Secret Resource
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Why Ports Need Allies: Maintaining a Working Waterfront Takes a Network of Supporters
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - The Next Generation of Leaders — Succession Planning Provides Security, Guidance for Future
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 20
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Port Security — An Exercise in Partnerships
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 24
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Lessons From the Past: A Renewed Commentary on Port Security
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Cyber Security: What Port Authorities Need to Know
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Tomorrow’s Leaders Need More Than On-the-Job Training
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 44
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 46
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - outsert1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - outsert2
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