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ABOVE: Norfolk International Terminal at the Port of Virginia. LEFT: At the Port of Virginia's Norfolk International Terminal, plans are to add RMG cranes and stacks instead of the current straddle stacks. gates and rail gates. At the Port of Virginia's Norfolk International Terminal, plans are to add RMG cranes and stacks instead of the current straddle stacks. "What that would allow us to do is add 400,000-capacity to that facility," Reinhart said. While RMG is an established technology, Reinhart notes that in the last decade, it has seen improvements in lasers and speed on lifting. The Port of Virginia currently is testing hybrid shuttle trucks and cars to improve on sustainability. It also has modernized gates so that workers can be in airconditioned environments. The Need for Speed While capacity certainly is a consideration for automation, speed is another. The Port of Long Beach (Calif.) opened up the now fully automated Middle Harbor terminal earlier this year with a goal of improving the truck turn times. "The truck can move into position, offload its container and stay in the exact position," said Jon Slangerup, the port's CEO. "It will receive its outbound container all in one single visit. It certainly is the most truckerfriendly facility we've built to date." But it's the speed that is most impressive. Just a few months after going live, Middle Harbor is "currently operating around 35 percent of the full build-out footprint," said Anthony Otto, president of the Long Beach Container Terminal, the facility operator. "Our new technologies, including our cutting-edge trucker interface, have been fully 18 AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE integrated into our operations and are running smoothly." Slangerup said that the system currently outpaces other automated terminals, "but of course, it's a newer generation of technology, so it has the benefits of all the lessons learned. I'm sure in some future place, there will be even more improvements." Otto points to "real-world testing prior to our 'go live' date. Operational experience suggests that exhaustive testing is the best predictor of potential problems. Because of our commitment to testing and training on every system - from our cranes to our AGVs - we positioned the company for a more problem-free start, avoiding any major operational challenges after our launch." The Need for Training As Middle Harbor transitioned to fully automated, it required a partnership with key stakeholders. "We've been extremely proactive in our outreach with the trucking community and the feedback we have received has been positive," Otto said. "We will continue to foster this relationship with the drayage community in order to maintain the high levels of success we are currently experiencing." But it has taken a concerted effort between the terminal operator and its parent company, Orient Overseas Container Line (OOCL). Together, the two have "committed nearly $8 million in assisting the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) membership with re-training and development of the niche skillsets required for the modernized systems at the new facility," Otto said. "We will continue to work with the ILWU and other stakeholders on these advanced training programs." And that is a vital component of any automation project: ensuring that workers are trained on the new technology and made aware of the benefits. "We have a pretty good workforce and are working well with our labor partners," Reinhart said. "You have to use technology to augment a good workforce so that you can handle more. We also have to be forwardthinking; what skills and training do we need to put in our workforce today to handle the technology of the future? You have to train as you go along." Slangerup notes that automation does not automatically mean job cuts. In the case of Middle Harbor, automation is being used to expand from 1 million TEUs to 3 million. "While there may be productivity gains as we fully deploy this terminal, there will be substantial net job growth," he said. "That is in jobs that are higher tech and higher paid than conventional minimally trained or skilled labor. It's the best of all worlds. The longshoremen that I've spoken to up in the cabs or control rooms love their jobs. The first thing that comes out of their mouths is, 'I'm not going to hurt anybody.' In the traditional manually operated terminals, there's a high degree of risk to life and limb. In this environment, the risk is mitigated for the human factor. It's still moving boxes around

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
The Future of Automation
Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Optimizing Systems for Profitability
New Orleans Marketplace
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 14
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - The Future of Automation
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 20
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 26
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 28
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 32
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 35
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 36
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 37
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 39
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 40
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 46
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 47
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 48
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 49
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 51
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 52
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 53
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 54
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 55
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 57
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 59
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 61
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Optimizing Systems for Profitability
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - New Orleans Marketplace
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 64
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 65
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - divider2
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