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Port of San Diego. The Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal at the Port of San Diego handles a variety of break bulk cargo. healthy ports are always considering ways to handle capacity challenges and promote productivity. Keeping the existing contracts and capturing new ones depends on efficient solutions for limited space - and no port would admit outright its space is limited, of course. Beneath the placid surface of the sea, there is a flurry of activity devoted to improving the long-term vision of a port without disrupting its current operations. Conversing with Garcia, it becomes clear that assessing efficiency at ports means determining the purpose of every component part. Does every physical structure serve its purpose to store cargo or corral passengers? Does every operational guideline serve the purpose of loading and unloading ships? Does every crane, forklift or other piece of equipment contribute to cargo-handling? Do the port's finances weigh equally its operational costs and its future ventures? Randa Coniglio, president and CEO at Port of San Diego, offers an example of this assessment in action. The Port of San Diego comprises two terminals: the National City Marine Terminal and the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal. "At Tenth Avenue, we have some very outdated infrastructure," Coniglio says. She explains that under-roof storage areas were necessary when San Diego imported paper for newspapers, but now, most of the port's cargo needs open space. The Port of San Diego has a $10 million TIGER Grant that will be used in part to demolish these obsolete sheds. Not only will the demolition create more space for roll-on/roll-off cargo, it will also continue to distinguish this port as a destination for unique cargo - the kind that does not fit on pallets or into crates or 36 AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE containers. "San Diego is known to be able to handle specialty cargo," Coniglio says. "We're always looking for areas to handle those items, and we've developed operational expertise and a high level of customer service to deal with this." Some of these specialty items include windmill blades, ship propellers, yachts and even fermentation tanks for local breweries. Growth is exciting to seaports, but it also connotes congestion. Depending on a port's tenants, cargo volume may expand more quickly than the port can respond. Accommodating volume goes beyond storage space; it also requires the manpower to fuel the cargo-handling process and ensure controlled, well-timed efforts to transport the cargo away from the port. Any broken links in the chain of efficiency mean delays ushering in the next vessel, and the inefficiency compounds from there. Timeliness matters because, as Garcia points out, the majority of freight coming into the United States comes through seaports. Smooth operations at a port have a ripple effect: other businesses get their goods on time and their operations continue smoothly, too. Despite the importance of U.S. seaports, parties competing for land and water "In an industry where vessels are getting bigger, and economic ebbs and flows constantly alter the volume of cargo, ports are expected to adapt." occupied by the ports are not always willing to concede property without a fight. In San Diego, Coniglio is well aware of this kind of capacity challenge. "There are competing demands for the valuable waterfront property in San Diego," she explains. "Hoteliers and municipalities want it for revenue-generating businesses and public access. We can't grow more in terms of acquiring more land, so we have to deal with the limited footprint that we have." San Diego is just one port striving to thrive symbiotically with nearby - very nearby - hotels and tourism. A new high-rise luxury hotel offers a view of port activity from its windows, and in a nod to the Dole Fresh Fruit Company, a major port tenant, the bar serves a banana-flavored cocktail. The forward-thinking port that can balance multiple parties' interests and see itself as an expert in strategy in addition to being an expert in cargo-handling will succeed when faced with capacity challenges. Garcia emphasizes that a port's strategic planning to capture and serve its customers, also relates to master planning, "where you quantify the strategy into equipment, infrastructure and operating improvements." As ports prepare spatially and financially for these capital investments, they might allow 20 or 30 years for such a plan. "Then, they go back on an annual basis to review, evaluate and update the plan, or adjust their direction or course." Ultimately, a steady eye on port operations and an honest assessment of how nimbly those operations can be improved make all the difference when a port is called upon to handle exceptionally large, exceptionally numerous or exceptionally unusual cargo. ●

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
The Future of Automation
Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Optimizing Systems for Profitability
New Orleans Marketplace
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 14
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - The Future of Automation
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 20
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 26
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 28
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 32
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 35
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 36
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 37
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 39
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 40
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 46
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 47
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 48
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 49
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 51
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 52
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 53
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 54
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 55
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 57
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 59
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 61
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Optimizing Systems for Profitability
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - New Orleans Marketplace
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 64
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 65
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Index of Advertisers
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - divider1
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