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A Good Problem to Have The State of the Cruise Industry Outlook published at the end of 2015 by the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) projected that more than 24 million passengers will take sail in 2016 globally, up from 10 million in 2006 and from a mere 1.4 million in 1980, when CLIA began tracking cruise ship passengers. "Cruise industry executives say that demand for new vessels will outpace delivery," said the South Florida Business Journal, reporting on a State of the Global Cruise Industry panel at the Seatrade Cruise Global conference March 2016 featuring CEOs of the top cruise lines, including Carnival, Norwegian and Royal Caribbean. And, the panel concluded, "There aren't enough shipyards to meet demand for new cruise ships." fall, Ocean of the Sea will be homeported at Port Canaveral, one of few ports, including Port Everglades and PortMiami, that can accommodate a vessel that size. Royal Caribbean's newest and biggest ship, Harmony of the Seas, can accommodate 6,410 passengers at maximum capacity. The Harmony, which is homeported in Port Everglades, and its sisters Oasis of the Seas and Anthem of the Seas, are in a class by themselves, but the trend toward increasingly large vessels is here to stay. Responding to the trend, Port of New Orleans, in a $23 million reconstruction of its Julia Street Terminal, converted two separate terminals into one large one. According to Johnny Cefalu, deputy director of the cruise port, "Royal Caribbean at that time was scheduled to bring in Voyager-class vessels [with 3,000-plus capacity], so we saw a need to interlock them together to make them one mega-terminal." To accommodate the increase in the number of passengers the renovation also included a much larger, 21,000-square-foot baggage laydown area, an expansive embarkation lobby and a vertical circulation core with elevators and escalators leading to the passenger bridge. The larger ships come with design changes that demand infrastructure upgrades in many ports. "Where the lifeboats used to be nestled into the shell of the ship, they are now outside the ship to create more space for cabins," explains Spina. "With that comes a whole host of new issues for ports." The old-style boarding bridges cannot reach the small space underneath the lifeboats to take passengers off the ship. "The infrastructure 54 AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE Cruise ships, such as this Carnival one, that dock in San Juan, Puerto Rico, do so right near the piers for the cargo ships. improvements in the passenger boarding bridges are important," says Spina. Most ports are listening, and installing new boarding bridges. The delivery of a new boarding bridge nearly derailed Canaveral's ultra-tight construction schedule on Terminal 5. "We had a very aggressive timeline and I think we missed it by one week," recalls Capt. Murray, "and that was not due to something within our control." The ship delivering the last piece of the gangway from Spain arrived about 10 days late. Juggling terminals for the Carnival vessel in port, says Capt. Murray, "we found a way to make up that time." Staying Productive in the Off-Season Because most ports, with the exception of those in Florida, are in full swing only six months of the year or less, many port authorities are looking at ways to repurpose their terminals for the off-season. "Montréal is seasonal," says Gilson. "We start in May and we end October. So when you have an infrastructure that is used only five months of the year you don't make a lot of money out of it. The rest of the year we rent the facilities for conferences, exhibits and meetings to generate revenue." The port is in the midst of a $78 million renovation of its 100-year-old Alexandra Pier and Iberville Passenger Terminal. The project is scheduled for completion in time for the 2017 cruise season and gala celebration of the city's 375th anniversary, "which is going to be a ball, a big party from January 1, 2017 till December 31," says Gilson. The remodeling will allow the terminal to handle more passengers more efficiently during cruise season and provide expanded facilities for events in the off-season. Port of Montréal is marketing the new facility for events now. "We are very well located in the heart of the Old Montréal," says Gilson, "so the view is beautiful and that will attract a lot of interest from the business community and people who want to organize events in Old Montréal." At Port of New Orleans, according to Allee, "we've looked at other uses for the terminals off-season, but we are pretty selective." When they do loan out the terminal, "we try to do things that have a maritime application." They've hosted a job fair with a focus on the maritime community. Plus, "we had what we call a 'tabletop security exercise,' with state, federal and local law enforcement" - a full-scale security exercise. Still, Port of New Orleans is considering opening to a wider audience at the new Poland Avenue Terminal, to be constructed at the port at a cost of some $50 million. "Through good engineering and architecture," says Allee, "we are considering how we can configure it to accommodate special events and create a revenue stream there." Of course, the primary business of this or any cruise port will always be to provide efficient boarding for ships in port, and to make the passenger experience as stress-free as possible. And considering the dramatic growth projected for the cruise industry, to handle the increasing demand and stay competitive, says Allee, "if you are not looking five to 10 years down the road - constantly looking at ways to improve the passenger experience - you're not doing your due diligence." ●

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
The Future of Automation
Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Optimizing Systems for Profitability
New Orleans Marketplace
Index of Advertisers
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 14
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - The Future of Automation
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 20
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 28
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 29
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 32
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 35
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 36
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 37
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 39
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 40
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 46
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 47
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 48
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 49
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 51
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 52
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 53
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 54
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 55
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 57
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 59
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 61
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Optimizing Systems for Profitability
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - New Orleans Marketplace
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 64
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 65
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Index of Advertisers
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