Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 10

ADA Advice
Handrail extension guidelines
do not specify when a handrail
that was bending would or would
not meet the minimum length
required. In other words, is the
12 inches measured to the end of
the physical handrail including the
bend, or is it to where the bend
starts? Ideally, the handrail profile
will allow a 12-inch extension so
a person relying on the handrail
for stability can step off of
the stairway or ramp surfaces
before they have to let go of the
handrail. Being very code literal,
that graspable surface must
extend 12 inches before any bend
or radius started to literally be
totally "horizontal," or matching
the slope. However, the intent
would be to extend the handrail
until a person could no longer
reasonably hold onto it, which
would typically include at least a
portion of the bend.
Where can a handrail overlapping
an intermediate landing be an
obstruction? The language in
IBC Sections 1003.3.3, 1005.7.2,
1014.8 and 1020.3 all relates to
handrails coming in 4½ inches
from the side wall into the width.
There is not an obstruction issue
where handrails are along wall
or continuous. Therefore, this is
typically not an issue on stairways,
because stair and landing widths
are the same. What about a
landing at a ramp turn where
the ramp and landings are not
the same size? While this could
happen at any angle less than 180
degrees, for simplicity let's look
at some 90-degree examples.
The minimum landing size is 60
inches by 60 inches. For a 36-inch
clear width between handrails, the
ramps joining to that landing are
typically at least 45 inches wide
(36"+4½"+4½"=45").
Let's consider this from the point
of usability: If the handrail bends
to be continuous and not protrude
over the landings, the 90-degree

10 | Licensed Architect | Summer 2017

Figure 2

bends are awkward to use (see
Figure 2). A smooth transition would
be more useable. If the argument
is that the handrails cannot extend
over the landing, literally this would
increase the size of the landing in
both directions (see Figure 3). I do
not believe this was the intent.

Figure 3

Go back to Figure 1 and consider
how the ramp landing is used. To
allow space to stop a person using a
wheelchair needs 60 inches straight
at the top and bottom of each run.
Once off the ramp run, they need
space to turn to start the next run. If
the handrails extension turn down to



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Licensed Architect - Summer 2017

President’s Message
ADA Advice Accessibility: Handrail Details for Stairways and Ramps
Continuing Education A Review of Window, Door and Skylight Standards and Certification
Buyer’s Guide
Feature Article The Necessary Accessory: Hardware
Continuing Education Providers/ ALA New Members
Insurance Design Professionals and Cyber Risk - Part 2
Second Chances for Buildings The New Roof is Still Leaking?
Feature Article What Do Clients Want? Amenities, style and function
Firm Management Tools for Small Firms: Time Management
Index of Advertisers
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Intro
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - cover1
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - cover2
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 3
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 4
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 5
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - President’s Message
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 7
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - ADA Advice Accessibility: Handrail Details for Stairways and Ramps
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 9
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 10
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 11
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 12
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 13
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 14
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 15
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Continuing Education A Review of Window, Door and Skylight Standards and Certification
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 17
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 18
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 19
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 20
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Buyer’s Guide
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 22
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 23
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 24
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Feature Article The Necessary Accessory: Hardware
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Continuing Education Providers/ ALA New Members
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Insurance Design Professionals and Cyber Risk - Part 2
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 28
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 29
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Second Chances for Buildings The New Roof is Still Leaking?
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 31
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 32
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Feature Article What Do Clients Want? Amenities, style and function
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 34
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 35
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Firm Management Tools for Small Firms: Time Management
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 37
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - cover3
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - cover4
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