Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 9

Figure 1

* The handrail can be located so
the handrail extension is not over
a circulation path-such as when
the handrail is along a wall. In this
situation, the handrail returns to
the wall so the end will not catch
on a person's sleeve when they
approach the stairway.
* Where the circulation path is
perpendicular to the stair or ramp
run, such as where there is a
corridor or sidewalk at the top or
bottom of the stairway or ramp, the
handrail extensions must return
to the post or ground so they are
detectable. If the P-shaped option
is chosen, the bottom must be at
27 inches or lower (IBC Section
1003.3.3) so it is detectable by a
person using a white cane.

Handrail extensions are required at
the top and bottom of each flight/
run, so someone using the handrail
for stability can get off the stepped
or sloped surface before they
have to let go of the handrail. On
stairways, handrails must extent
horizontally at least 12 inches past
the top riser and continue to slope
at least one tread depth past the
bottom riser. On a ramp, handrail
must extend horizontally at least
12 inches past the ramp run. In new
construction, handrail extensions
are required to extend in the
direction of the stair or ramp run
(IBC Section 1014.6).
ADA Note
The 1991 ADA asked for an additional
12-inch horizontal extension at the
bottom of stairways; or a total of at
least 23 inches. This actually was
required only when there was no
accessible route between levels
[ADAAG 4.1.3(4)]. A lot of designers
just looked at the technical criteria
and put them on all stairways,
including on stairways next to ramps
and on exit stairways in buildings with
elevators. The 2010 ADA Standard
for Accessible Design has dropped
this requirement, and the IBC never
included it. However, this detail
continues to be automatically added

to design drawings. While having this
extra extension is not prohibited by
code, there may be issues with that
extra length when also looking at
egress routes.
IEBC Note
In existing buildings, the IEBC
prescriptive method (IEBC Section
403.1 Exception 2) allows for a
shorter handrail extension where
the extension would be hazardous,
such as possibly blocking egress.
The IEBC work area method requires
the handrail to be the length of
the stairway and does not require
extensions (IEBC Section 805.9,
1012.4.4, 1209.3). The performance
compliance method does not
require compliance with the handrail
provisions (IEBC Section 1401.6.11).

The Stairway Manufactures
Association did extensive dynamic
testing for the graspability of
handrails. Their studies resulted in the
Type 1 and Type 2 handrail provisions
(IBC Sections 1014.3.1 and 1014.3.2)
for handrail shapes. Both options
provide "equivalent graspability," a
shape that allows for someone to
have a firm grasp on
the handrail.

The handrail extension can be a
protruding object. There are options
to address this:
* Where the handrail is continuous
to another stair flight or ramp run,
such as the inside handrail on a
U-turn along a stairway or ramp,
handrail extensions is not required.
The handrail height is forgiven at
the turn so the handrail transition
can be smooth (IBC Section
1014.2 Exp.1).

Summer 2017 | Licensed Architect | 9



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Licensed Architect - Summer 2017

President’s Message
ADA Advice Accessibility: Handrail Details for Stairways and Ramps
Continuing Education A Review of Window, Door and Skylight Standards and Certification
Buyer’s Guide
Feature Article The Necessary Accessory: Hardware
Continuing Education Providers/ ALA New Members
Insurance Design Professionals and Cyber Risk - Part 2
Second Chances for Buildings The New Roof is Still Leaking?
Feature Article What Do Clients Want? Amenities, style and function
Firm Management Tools for Small Firms: Time Management
Index of Advertisers
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Intro
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - cover1
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - cover2
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 3
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 4
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 5
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - President’s Message
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 7
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - ADA Advice Accessibility: Handrail Details for Stairways and Ramps
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 9
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 10
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 11
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 12
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 13
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 14
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 15
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Continuing Education A Review of Window, Door and Skylight Standards and Certification
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 17
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 18
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 19
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 20
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Buyer’s Guide
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 22
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 23
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 24
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Feature Article The Necessary Accessory: Hardware
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Continuing Education Providers/ ALA New Members
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Insurance Design Professionals and Cyber Risk - Part 2
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 28
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 29
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Second Chances for Buildings The New Roof is Still Leaking?
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 31
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 32
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Feature Article What Do Clients Want? Amenities, style and function
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 34
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 35
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Firm Management Tools for Small Firms: Time Management
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - 37
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - cover3
Licensed Architect - Summer 2017 - cover4
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