Licensed Architect - Winter 2015 - (Page 28)

LINETEC Continuing Education Architectural Coatings: Field Performance and the Application Process Provided by Linetec BY TAMMY SCHROEDER, SENIOR MARKETING SPECIALIST B uilding materials and surfaces are put through some of the most rigorous, day-to-day durability challenges. It helps to know which finishes will be the best choice for maintaining the longest lifespan possible. This certainly applies to exterior architectural aluminum. The finishing technologies and processes involved in this area of design and construction are extremely important. In the architectural industry, the two types of factory-applied finishes for aluminum are anodize and paint. Both processes can deliver a long-lasting finish on building Electricity products. The finish choice is based on a combination of personal taste and performance criteria. What Is Anodizing? Anodizing is the process of electrochemically controlling, accelerating and enhancing oxidation of an aluminum substrate. The anodizing process produces an oxide film that is uniform, hard and protects the rest of the aluminum substrate from deterioration. The coating produced is extremely durable, and the hardness of the surface is comparable to a sapphire- the second hardest substance on earth. This characteristic makes anodize an Chemicals Aluminum Aluminum Oxide Coating In the architectural industry, the two types of factory-applied finishes for aluminum are anodize and paint. Both processes can deliver a long-lasting finish on building products. 28 | Licensed Architect | Winter 2015 excellent choice for use in high-traffic areas where resistance properties are important. The typical anodizing employed in the architectural industry is called "two-step electrolytic." The actual anodizing and coloring of the aluminum occur in separate steps of the process. Each step is critical to ensure a quality product. The first step is racking the material. Material is clamped or welded to a rack so electrical contact can be made. Contact is critical to ensure mil thickness and tight color match. After racking, the anodize process begins with the material being cleaned in a non-etching alkaline chemical cleaner to remove all shop dirt, water, soluble oils, etc., which may have accumulated on the material.

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Licensed Architect - Winter 2015

President’s Letter
Legal Issues The New Construction Industry Arbitration Rules
ADA Advice Accessible Showers: The Devil is in the Details
Conference Recap
ALA New Members
Continuing Education Architectural Coatings: Field Performance and the Application Process
Chapter News
Membership
Second Chances: Evaluating Repair Approaches for Historic and Contemporary Window Systems
Insurance Information “Go” “No-Go” Project Evaluation
Firm Management Want To Be More Profitable? Here’s How
Index to Advertisers

Licensed Architect - Winter 2015

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