The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 14

The first lobby hanging is viewed as a process, as one moves along the hallway. In
that way, it is rather like a mobile sculpture - the view changes, not as the art moves,
but as the person advances past it, thereby seeing the changing dimensions of the
piece and the reflections in the mirrors of the surroundings and passers-by.
Twenty-five years later, the wool hangings still impress visitors. The colours remain
vibrant, and the design has not dated. They lift the buildings out of the ordinary - it is
not just everyday basic social housing. The wool sculptures, because of their uniqueness, retain their novelty, even to the residents. The manager reports that they are
sometimes the focus of complaints from her more opinionated tenants, but that, she
explains with a smile, is a good indicator of resident satisfaction: "I guess if they cannot find anything to complain about, they can always comment on the art."
Do such pieces of art have a value? At a conference a few years ago, the chief
architect for the City of Melbourne, Australia, said their city council felt they received
exceedingly high returns from their investments in public art - not the ever-popular
"man-on-horse" variety, but interesting things that caused people to change the way
they used and perceived the city, and the way they moved through it.
In this little housing project, just as in Melbourne, art has proven to be a worthwhile
and cost-effective expenditure. To achieve the same impact with bricks and mortar
would have involved a larger lobby, as well as better finishes and furniture - things
beyond the limited budget. With the wall hangings, the cost was contained to a
specific and lower amount. These pieces of elegant, thoughtful and timeless work
raise the buildings from being just ordinary to being something special. It was money
well spent.
DORIS BILITZ, with a Bachelor of Administration (Health Services) and a Diploma in Business
Administration, is Manager Golden Town Residential Community, Meaford Ontario, responsible for the
supervision and management of approximately 120 senior citizens' units.
LUCINDA HARP, a graduate of the Ryerson interior design program, is an interior designer and the creator
of the artworks discussed in this essay.
IAN ELLINGHAM is Chair of the Built Environment Open Forum and The Right Angle Journal
Editorial Committee. The Golden Town Residential Community, Meaford Ontario, was designed by Sedun +
Kanerva, Architects.

EXPERIENTIAL ART & ARCHITECTURE
by GORDON S. GRICE, OAA, FRAIC

he idea of art in public spaces goes back at least 3,000 years, to the
statue of the Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II, immortalized in Shelley's poem
Ozymandias. But as Shelley points out, the original intent of such art was not
so much to entertain as to commemorate, to impress and often to intimidate:
"look on my works, ye mighty, and despair." The use of public art as a means
of memorializing, impressing, and perhaps stirring up national pride, has continued
throughout history, to the present day - think of the Emperor Hadrian, Admiral Nelson,
Chairman Mao, Vladimir Lenin, Darth Vader.1
In ancient times, as now, public art had other important objectives. First, it had to
be part of a story that would engage the users of the space, whether it was a chronicle
of a famous battle, or a well-known fairy tale. Second, it had to somehow authenticate
the space by providing elements that were native to the location and would help to
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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018

Message from the Board
Art & Architecture
UX and Architecture
Index to Advertisers
Locations
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - Intro
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - cover1
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - cover2
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 3
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 4
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 5
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - Message from the Board
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - Art & Architecture
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 8
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 9
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 10
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 11
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 12
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 13
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 14
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 15
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 16
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 17
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - UX and Architecture
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 19
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - Index to Advertisers
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - 21
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - Locations
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - cover3
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2018 - cover4
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