The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 7

A greater hurdle than the floods are the laws that are often put in place to demolish
communities and evict residents: Move or lose your financial support. The economic
argument for this measure seems to revolve around how much is required to maintain
the house, without consideration for the strong cultural roots of communities. There are
lasting hardships imposed on people that have been forced to abandon their homes,
both financial and social. Adaptive flood risk reduction strategies such as buoyant
foundations offer a solution that should be reviewed on a case-by-case basis, to offer
options for reducing hazard vulnerability and maintaining communities, residences and
heritage through long-term disaster resilience.
The problem of flooding is not unique to Louisiana. Large populations living in
coastal areas and floodplains throughout the world are increasingly vulnerable. Here
in Ontario, and in our First Nations Communities, many suffer from a similar losing
proposition. In October, 2018, a floating research pavilion was installed on a stormwater retention pond at the University of Waterloo, in Ontario. With a particular focus
on flood-prone Indigenous communities, the pavilion is intended to provide valuable
information for retrofitting existing homes, and consequently preventing dislocation
of entire communities.1
Information provided by Dr. Elizabeth English, University of Waterloo and the Buoyant
Foundation Project has been used in the writing of this article.2
BILL BIRDSELL is an architect in Guelph, Ontario. He is a Director of the Built Environment Open Forum and
a Past President of the Ontario Association of Architects.

NOTES:

1. http://buoyantfoundation.org/nrc-research-pavilion
2. www.buoyantfoundation.org

THE BATHROOM - AN INTRODUCTION
by GORDON S. GRICE, OAA, FRAIC

A recent study of reading habits (Book Industry Study Group Report No. 6,
1978) revealed, without much pleasure, that as many readers do their
reading in the bathroom as in libraries.
- Frank Muir, An Irreverent and Almost Complete Social History of the Bathroom
New York: Stein and Day, 19831

More than 2.6 billion people around the world don't have access to safe
sanitation. Instead of using toilets connected to sewer lines, most leave
their waste on the ground or in a ditch or pit.
- "Village Bathrooms and Toilets," in Toilets and Sanitation in the
Developing World (Third World)2

e can thank modern plumbing for the fact that two basic, seemingly
incompatible, human necessities - cleanliness and elimination - can be
accommodated in one small space. The contemporary bathroom, for all
its convenience, also accounts for a whopping 65 per cent of household
water consumption (30 per cent for toilet flushing and 35 per cent for bathing).3 The
unlikely combination of activities seems perfectly natural to us, but for most of human
history, these two functions were treated separately.
Early hominids could afford to take an ad hoc approach to "bathroom" activities, since
there was lots of space and few inhabitants. It wasn't until the arrival of permanent
settlements that sanitation and water collection needed to be organized intelligently.
The Neolithic villages of Orkney, Scotland boasted a tree-bark-constructed system of
supply and sanitation. The Minoans used underwater clay pipes for the same purposes.
The Romans advanced the technology with aqueducts (civic water supply) and cloacas
(sewage system). Sewage purification was still a long way off.
The Right Angle | Spring 2020 | 7


http://www.buoyantfoundation.org/nrc-research-pavilion http://www.buoyantfoundation.org

The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020

Water
Index to Advertisers
Locations
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - Intro
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - cover1
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - cover2
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 3
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - Water
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 5
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 6
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 7
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 8
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 9
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 10
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - Index to Advertisers
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 12
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - 13
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - Locations
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - cover3
The Right Angle Journal - Spring 2020 - cover4
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