BUILDING SUPPLY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION - November/December 2018 - 14

FEATURE

THE

PROS
CONS

GLUE ASSIST
S

queaking, popping and
crackling floors have
become a hot-button
issue. One remedy installers
have tried is employing
a glue-assist method of
installation. The addition of
adhesive can certainly aid in
reducing the chance of noisy
floors however, there seems
to be confusion as to when an
installer should employ such a
method or how to do it.

The NWFA Installation Guidelines
for assisting with adhesive states that
for solid plank 3/4 x 3 inch or wider,
"Blind fastener spacing along the
lengths of the strips, minimum two
fasteners per piece near the ends
(1 to 3 inches). In addition, every 6 to
8 inches apart for blind nailing, 10 to
12 inches for face nailing. To assist
the nailing schedule, option is to
apply adhesive."
The statement for employing a
glue assist method is very general,

14

leaving it up to the manufacturer's
or installer's discretion. There are
many variables to consider before
installing a plank floor, resulting
in the general statement, with one
being whether the plank flooring is
solid or engineered. Solid wide-plank
flooring is different than strip
flooring. A strip floor will have
more fasteners than wide-plank
flooring. In some instances, nails
alone will not provide enough
holding power to hold a plank
floor down sufficiently to prevent
squeaking. Engineered flooring
is manufactured in many ways so
one standard that encompasses
all platforms and thicknesses isn't
possible. The standard for whether
or not an engineered plank floor
should be glue assisted is left to
the manufacturer's discretion. If
the installation instructions don't
mention anything about glue assist
then it is important to contact
the manufacturer's technical
representatives.

NEWS MAGAZINE | BCFCA NEWS | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018

AND
OF
There are also site-related issues to
consider - the site itself may not be
suitable to rely on fasteners alone to
affix the floor without squeaking.
There are several conditions that
must be considered:

Subfloor Assembly
* If the subfloor itself is squeaking,
the subfloor should be corrected
prior to installation. Gluing and
nailing a plank floor is not a
remedy for a squeaky subfloor.
If the subfloor squeaks prior to
installation, it will squeak after, too.
* Building a subfloor to meet
minimum building code
requirements may not be suitable
for the flooring to be installed.
The subfloor standards in the
NWFA Guidelines are written as
though 3/4-inch solid T&G flooring
is to be installed. This standard
is not related to thinner solid
or engineered products. If the
subfloor has too much deflection,
the floor may squeak after



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING SUPPLY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION - November/December 2018

https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPQ0320
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPQ0220
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPQ0120
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPQ0419
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPQ0319
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPQ0219
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPQ0119
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPS0518
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPS0318
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPS0218
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPS0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPS0617
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPS0517
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPS0417
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/BSPS/BSPS0317
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com