Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 47

intérêt pour la technologie des groupes motopropulseurs. La
is shorthand for "hydrogen fuel cell-electric rail," and it is
❱ oneHydrail
❱ teldominance
des locomotives diesels-électriques est apparue à la
of the most profound technological innovation opportunities to
hit the railway supply chain in decades. You would have to go back
more than 50 years to see the market demonstrate such interest in
revolutionary powertrain technology. The dominance of diesel-electric
locomotives, in which engines power electric generators to drive the
wheels, emerged in the late 1940s. Electrified railcars, which draw
power from overhead wires, date from the 1880s.
Hydrail systems are all-electric, but the basic elements are
analogous to diesel-electric systems. Instead of diesel tanks, there
are cylindrical reservoirs containing hydrogen gas, and instead of a
diesel engine-and-generator, there is a set of PEM (proton exchange
membrane) fuel cells. Similar to a battery, the fuel cells produce
an electric current through an electrochemical process that bonds
hydrogen (H2 drawn from the reservoirs) with oxygen (O2 drawn
form the surrounding air), emitting only pure water vapour (H2O).
A battery pack is also integrated to serve as an energy
buffer between the fuel cells and the traction motors. In this
configuration, the fuel cell generates the energy needed to propel
the train throughout its route, and the battery handles the demand
for power during acceleration. During braking, the battery can
recoup energy from the wheels. Maintaining the appropriate
state-of-charge in the battery is the job of the fuel cells.
In all other respects, the principles of diesel- and fuel
cell-electric train design and operation are similar. Fuel is loaded,
the train runs its route, and then returns to base for refuelling.
This operational similarity is one of the appeals of Hydrail.
Also appealing is that no combustion of fuel takes place; hence,
no combustion emissions. As with electrified rail, Hydrail is a
zero-emission form of propulsion. Furthermore, hydrogen can be
produced from zero-carbon electricity. You may recall learning
about electrolysis in high school science class. A current of
electricity is applied to water, separating the H2O molecules into
oxygen and hydrogen gas. Electrolysis can also be performed
with high-voltage grid power, generating tonnes of hydrogen. If
the electricity is sourced from hydropower or nuclear generating
stations, or from passive renewables like wind and solar, then the
hydrogen is effectively a zero-carbon fuel.
The ability to convert low-cost, low-carbon electricity into
hydrogen, store and then use that hydrogen later is profoundly
valuable to railway operators who need to electrify. The
established approach for surface rail involves constructing
elaborate infrastructure to support power lines high over the
tracks (called catenary wires) to which a locomotive connects via
a pantograph. But this approach is proving prohibitively expensive,
even for governments. The cost barriers are most acute when
conversions of existing railways from diesel to electrified service
are attempted, particularly in urban environments.
These challenges were evident in the cancellation of several major
electrification projects last year in Great Britain. Escalating costs,
service disruptions during construction and local opposition to the
visual intrusion of catenary infrastructure on the landscape were
contributing factors. With catenary systems, years of construction
must be financed and endured before the benefits of electrified rail
can be fully realized, and this becomes a source of project risk.
In contrast, Hydrail electrification begins immediately upon
the first vehicle entering service. With each new Hydrail vehicle 48

❱

fin des années 1940. Les wagons électrifiés, qui tirent leur énergie
des câbles aériens, datent des années 1880.
Les systèmes Hydrail sont entièrement électriques, mais les
éléments de base sont analogues aux systèmes diesels-électriques.
Au lieu de réservoirs diesel, ils ont des réservoirs d'hydrogène,
et au lieu d'un moteur diesel et d'une génératrice, on trouve un
ensemble de piles à combustible MEP (membrane d'échange de
protons). Les piles à combustible produisent un courant électrique
par un processus électrochimique qui combine l'hydrogène (H2 tiré
des réservoirs) à l'oxygène (O2 aspiré dans l'air ambiant), émettant
seulement de la vapeur d'eau pure (H2O).
Un bloc-batterie est également intégré pour servir de
tampon entre les piles à combustible et les moteurs. Dans
cette configuration, la pile à combustible produit l'énergie pour
propulser le train, et la batterie répond à l'appel de puissance
pendant l'accélération. Pendant le freinage, la batterie peut
récupérer l'énergie des roues. Le maintien de l'état de charge
approprié dans la batterie est la tâche des piles à combustible.
À tous les autres égards, les principes de conception et
d'exploitation des trains électriques à diesel et à piles à
combustible sont semblables. Le carburant est chargé, le train
parcourt son itinéraire, puis revient à la base pour le ravitaillement
en carburant. Cette similitude opérationnelle est l'un des
attraits d'Hydrail.
Il est également intéressant de noter qu'il n'y a pas de
combustion. Comme pour le rail électrique, Hydrail est une forme
de propulsion sans émission. De plus, l'hydrogène peut être produit
à partir d'électricité sans carbone. Vous vous rappelez peut-être
avoir appris l'électrolyse en cours de sciences au secondaire. Un
courant d'électricité est appliqué à l'eau, séparant les molécules
H2O en oxygène et en hydrogène gazeux. L'électrolyse peut aussi
être réalisée avec l'électricité d'un réseau haute tension, générant
des tonnes d'hydrogène. Si l'électricité provient de centrales
hydroélectriques ou nucléaires, ou d'énergies renouvelables
passives comme l'énergie éolienne et solaire, alors l'hydrogène est
effectivement un combustible sans carbone.
La capacité de convertir de l'électricité à faible coût, de la
stocker et de l'utiliser plus tard est extrêmement précieuse.
L'approche établie pour les chemins de fer de surface consiste
à construire une infrastructure élaborée pour soutenir
les lignes électriques au-dessus des voies (appelées fils
caténaires) auxquelles une locomotive se connecte par un
pantographe. Mais cette approche s'avère prohibitive, même
pour les gouvernements. Les obstacles aux coûts sont plus
importants lorsque l'on tente de convertir les chemins de fer
existants du diesel au service électrique, particulièrement en
milieu urbain.
Ces défis ont été évidents lors de l'annulation de plusieurs
grands projets d'électrification, l'an dernier en Grande-Bretagne.
L'escalade des coûts, les interruptions de service pendant
la construction et l'opposition locale à l'intrusion visuelle de
l'infrastructure caténaire dans le paysage ont été des facteurs
contributifs. Avec les systèmes caténaires, des années de
construction doivent être financées et supportées avant que les
48
avantages du rail électrifié puissent être pleinement réalisés.

❱

The Canadian Association of Railway Suppliers / Association Canadienne des Fournisseurs de Chemins de Fer 47



Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018

President’s Message
Bigger Hopper Cars, Faster Grain Shipments
Canada’s New Locomotive Emissions Regulations
Liquid Assets
Hydrail: A Profound Innovation Opportunity for Canadian Railway Suppliers
Locomotive and Passenger Car Freeze-Up Downtime Can Be Prevented
From Last Spike to First in Class: Creativity, Collaboration, and Determination in the Pursuit of Leadership
How to Achieve a Respectful, Harassment-Free Workplace
CARS News
New Members
CapEx: An Industry-Wide Look at Who’s Spending What
Railway Supplier Buyers’ Guide
Advertiser.com
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - Intro
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - cover1
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - cover2
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 3
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 4
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 5
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 6
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 7
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 8
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - insert3
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - insert4
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - President’s Message
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 10
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 11
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - Bigger Hopper Cars, Faster Grain Shipments
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 13
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 14
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - insert1
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - insert2
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 15
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 16
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 17
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 18
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 19
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - Canada’s New Locomotive Emissions Regulations
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 21
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 22
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 23
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 24
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 25
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 26
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 27
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 28
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 29
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 30
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 31
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - Liquid Assets
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 33
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 34
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 35
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 36
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 37
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 38
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 39
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 40
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 41
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 42
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 43
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - Hydrail: A Profound Innovation Opportunity for Canadian Railway Suppliers
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 45
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 46
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 47
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 48
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 49
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - Locomotive and Passenger Car Freeze-Up Downtime Can Be Prevented
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 51
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - From Last Spike to First in Class: Creativity, Collaboration, and Determination in the Pursuit of Leadership
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 53
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 54
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 55
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 56
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 57
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 58
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 59
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - How to Achieve a Respectful, Harassment-Free Workplace
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 61
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 62
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 63
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 64
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 65
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 66
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 67
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - CARS News
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 69
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 70
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - New Members
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 72
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - CapEx: An Industry-Wide Look at Who’s Spending What
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - Railway Supplier Buyers’ Guide
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 75
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 76
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 77
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 78
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 79
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - Advertiser.com
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 81
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - 82
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - cover3
Insidetrack - Spring/Summer 2018 - cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CRSB/CRSB0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CRSB/CRSB0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CRSB/CRSB0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CRSB/CRSB0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CRSB/CRSB0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CRSB/CRSB0215
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CRSB/CRSB0115
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com