The Executive - November/December 2018 - 22

That announcement is better than:
"We have closed the chapters in these
five areas because of low membership."
Details help people understand the
necessity for the change. Providing
an avenue forward for the members
makes it seem that the decision
considered other avenues and the
impact it will have on members.
Leaders Need to Be Open to
Change and Be Responsive
How should leaders reassess
decisions considering new information?
Information management will continue
to be a challenge. Whether it's 50 people
or 5,000, and whether it's a change
in ownership, strategy, or structure,
leaders need to manage information
during times of crisis. Leaders need
to get in front of situations before they
morph into crises, and they can do that
by communicating with their teams.
Leaders need to:
* Prepare staff for an upcoming
management change in advance of
an announcement to prepare them
before the news reaches the media
and their market.
* Schedule a pre-message meeting
with staff to ensure they are aware
of changes and to allow time for
processing, questions, and feedback.
* Have face-to-face briefings to allow
senior people to express various
points of view.

22

* Keep a finger on the pulse by
conducting a short, targeted
employee survey. This will allow you
to gauge attitude changes, assess
their understanding of change,
and collect feedback. Warning: If
you survey employees and do not
get back to them on the findings,
you risk losing more engagement.
If you survey people, then use that
information.
Leaders Learn from Failures
and Keep Going
"The amount of time people waste
dwelling on failures, rather than putting
that energy into another project, always
amazes me." -Richard Branson, Virgin
Chairman
Every business and association
leader faces risks, challenges, and
failures. I am fond of relating this to
horses. The more you ride horses, the
more confident you get. The more
confident you get, the faster you want
to go. You want to jump bigger jumps,
ride more challenging horses, and ride
more to become better. The more risks
you take, the more you increase your
chance of falling off. When people tell
me they have never fallen off a horse,
I generally say, "Then ride more. If
you ride enough, you'll fall off. And
that teaches you how not to fall off."
In other words, push yourself. Failure
means you are trying.
Effective leaders are intentional
and committed to building their
corporate culture. They take smart
risks, develop successful business
strategies, and take ownership of
mistakes to pave the way for stronger
relationships with stakeholders.
Mistakes are lessons. We learn
and move on. That's part of process
improvement. When business leaders
haven't failed, there's always a fear
of failure. Experienced leaders see
failures as lessons to inspire them
to keep moving forward despite
adversity.
When mistakes occur, leaders know
they need to fix the problem, not the
blame. Leaders need to not only accept
responsibility but communicate that
responsibility.
Toyota CEO Jim Lentz went
on social news site Digg to answer
questions about a massive faulty brake
recall. He answered as many questions
as possible while providing complete
transparency.

Ca lSAE's T HE E XEC U T IV E - NO V E M B E R/ DE C E M BE R 2 0 1 8

Leaders need to show authenticity and
empathy. They may stop during a speech
to tell heartfelt stories, or they may make
pop-up appearances at satellite offices
to rally staff. Sometimes they even make
appearances to comfort others.
When three Starbucks employees
were killed in a botched D.C. robbery,
then-CEO Howard Schultz flew to D.C.
and spent a week with staff and families.
Jim Sinegal, Costco's CEO, had a
leadership approach that made him
relatable and approachable. He chose
a simple nametag, answered his own
phone, limited his salary, and didn't
separate his office from staff. He also
had one of the lowest turnover rates in
retail history.
Leaders of the future will
understand that a mere paycheck is not
enough. Employees want a cause, and
they want treatment like they are part
of a team that is bigger than themselves.
Aside from businesses that allow flex
time and remote work, here's how some
companies help their teams:
* Intel provides tuition
reimbursement.
* Aflac hosts an annual
appreciation week.
* Hasbro gives staff three weeks'
vacation when they start
employment.
* Stryker has office ping-pong tables.
* Google has free food and
casual offices.
* Hilcorp Energy provides payout
incentives for meeting production
quotas.
The best leaders inspire change
and influence others, especially
during times of crisis, mistakes,
and transformation. Then they
communicate the changes to their
teams quickly, with enough detail to
illustrate that they considered multiple
options.
However a leader communicates,
they should have a clear and consistent
message. Effective communication
is about teaching and learning from
others, being compassionate, and
ensuring they keep teams informed.
Commander Mary Kelly, US Navy,
PhD, CSP is the CEO of Productive
Leadership. A best-selling author of 11
books, including Master Your World,
Mary focuses on leadership and economic
development. Reach her at
mary@productiveleaders.com.



The Executive - November/December 2018

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Executive - November/December 2018

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE: CalSAE Still in the Middle of Its Story By Jim Anderson, CAE
AT A GLANCE BY THE NUMBERS: Understanding Gen Z as They Enter the Workforce
AT A GLANCE BLOG SPOT: The Importance of Virtual Meetings
AT A GLANCE TECH TOOLS: Prioritize Your Association’s Technology Needs
AT A GLANCE CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Want Successful Marketing Campaigns? Don’t Leave Emotions at the Door
A Tale of Three Chapters: Rebuild, Rebrand or Reinvent
Don’t Let These Communication Culprits Derail Your Content
Is Your Communication Keeping Up with Leadership Evolutions?
Embrace Your Personal Brand— And Make it Work for You
DESTINATION: Wining-and-Dining in Style in Northern California
NEW MEMBERS
INDEX TO ADVERTISERS
MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: Laura Calderon Rivera
The Executive - November/December 2018 - Intro
The Executive - November/December 2018 - cover1
The Executive - November/December 2018 - cover2
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 3
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 4
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 5
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 6
The Executive - November/December 2018 - PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE: CalSAE Still in the Middle of Its Story By Jim Anderson, CAE
The Executive - November/December 2018 - AT A GLANCE CALENDAR OF EVENTS
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 9
The Executive - November/December 2018 - Want Successful Marketing Campaigns? Don’t Leave Emotions at the Door
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 11
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 12
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 13
The Executive - November/December 2018 - A Tale of Three Chapters: Rebuild, Rebrand or Reinvent
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 15
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 16
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 17
The Executive - November/December 2018 - Don’t Let These Communication Culprits Derail Your Content
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 19
The Executive - November/December 2018 - Is Your Communication Keeping Up with Leadership Evolutions?
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 21
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 22
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 23
The Executive - November/December 2018 - Embrace Your Personal Brand— And Make it Work for You
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 25
The Executive - November/December 2018 - 26
The Executive - November/December 2018 - DESTINATION: Wining-and-Dining in Style in Northern California
The Executive - November/December 2018 - NEW MEMBERS
The Executive - November/December 2018 - INDEX TO ADVERTISERS
The Executive - November/December 2018 - MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: Laura Calderon Rivera
The Executive - November/December 2018 - cover3
The Executive - November/December 2018 - cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0618
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0518
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0418
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0318
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0218
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0617
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0517
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0417
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0317
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0616
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0516
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0416
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0316
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0615
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0515
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0415
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0315
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0215
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CSES/CSES0115
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com