CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 14

feature

OSHA FOCUSES ON
TRENCH SAFETY AS
INCIDENTS RISE NATIONWIDE

Between October 1, 2017 and September
30, 2018, approximately 30 of the inspections conducted by the U.S. Department
of Labor Occupational Safety and Health
(OSHA) in Connecticut resulted in the issuance of serious/repeat or willful citations for
safety and health hazards related to trenches
and excavations.
OSHA kicked off a national emphasis
program (NEP) on preventing trenching
and excavation collapses in response to
a recent national spike in trenching fatalities. Statistics reported by the U.S. Bureau
of Labor Statistics show that there were
36 excavation or trenching cave-in deaths
across all U.S. industries. This number has
grown from 13 in 2014 to 25 in 2015, reaching 36 in 2016.1
An NEP is designed to increase outreach, education and enforcement efforts.
The program began October 1, 2018 with a
three-month education and prevention outreach program, and enforcement activities
will begin after the outreach period - however,
OSHA will continue to respond to complaints,
referrals, hospitalizations and fatalities during
the outreach period.
Safety and health compliance officers
will be mandated to stop and inspect any
site on which excavation is occurring,
says Paul Mangiafico, OSHA Compliance
Assistance Specialist in Hartford. During
the NEP, this mandate to inspect applies
whether or not an accident has occurred or
a complaint has been made - all it takes is
for the compliance officer to see excavating on a site.
14 / CONNstruction / WINTER 2018

SHINOBI/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

By Sheryl S. Jackson

While the risk of a cave-in is real,
another likely cause of an injury related
to trenching or excavation work is being
struck by an object, says Mangiafico. "All
of the five excavation-related accidents
in Connecticut last year, two of which
involved fatalities, were cases of employees being struck by objects." Struck by
hazards include equipment parked too
close to the edge and falling into the trench
or excavation, or items that are suspended,
including manhole covers, piping or other
materials. "When working in a trench,

employees are often on their hands and
knees, or bent over and looking down to
work, which means they don't see something falling and they can't get out of the
way," Mangiafico says.
All the risks related to trenching and excavating include: cave-ins, falls, falling loads,
dangerous atmosphere and equipment or
soil placed too close to the trench falling
onto workers.
Because excavation means removal
of soil, it is important to place the material removed at least 2 feet away from the



CONNstruction - Winter 2018

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of CONNstruction - Winter 2018

Fleet Tracking with Telematics
Don’t Let Vibration Damages Shake You
Trenching and Excavation Safety
Preventing Runovers and Backovers in Work Zones and Construction Sites
If OSHA Knocks, How Do You Respond?
Diggers Mixers Fixers Golf Outing
2018 AGC/CT Industry Recognition Dinner
Connecticut Road Builder Association Dinner
YCF Yard Goat Baseball/BBQ & Fall Membership Meeting
OSHA-CCIA-ConnOSHA Annual Safety Alliance Conference & Press Conference
A Blue Light for Safety
“If You See Something, Say Something” Applies to More Than Homeland Security
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Intro
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - cover1
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - cover2
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 3
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 4
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 5
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - A Blue Light for Safety
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - “If You See Something, Say Something” Applies to More Than Homeland Security
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Fleet Tracking with Telematics
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 9
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 10
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 11
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Don’t Let Vibration Damages Shake You
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 13
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Trenching and Excavation Safety
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 15
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 16
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 17
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Preventing Runovers and Backovers in Work Zones and Construction Sites
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 19
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 20
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 21
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - If OSHA Knocks, How Do You Respond?
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 23
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 24
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 25
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Diggers Mixers Fixers Golf Outing
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 2018 AGC/CT Industry Recognition Dinner
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Connecticut Road Builder Association Dinner
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - OSHA-CCIA-ConnOSHA Annual Safety Alliance Conference & Press Conference
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 30
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - cover3
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - cover4
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - outsert1
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - outsert2
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - outsert3
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - outsert4
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