CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 9

port and use GPS technology to track time
and location information for the vehicle. The
device gathers data on driver behaviors such
as speed, braking and acceleration, and
data on the vehicle such as distance driven
and fuel levels.
All of this information gets delivered to a
user interface, such as a mobile app, that
companies can use to monitor their fleets.
Fleet managers can then use the analytics
they gather to specify routes, maximize fuel
efficiency, track work hours and develop
driver safety. Companies can rely on this
information to assess risk so they can adjust
their insurance premiums.
"The goals are to improve driver performance," Woodin says. "It's really a focus on
reducing vehicle incidents."

Immediate results measured

getting underway, and refers to the transfer of information over telecommunication.
"Telematics" combines the words "telecommunication" and "informatics."
In using telematics, construction joins
the ranks of a host of industries that are
benefiting from the technology. Forecasts
predict that by the year 2022, the global
market for vehicle telematics is expected
to reach about $103 billion, doubling from
an estimated $55 billion in 2018.
In fleet management, telematics technology enables construction companies
to track their vehicles and drivers' habits
in real time.
Here's how it works: Telematics devices
plug into the vehicle's onboard diagnostic

Tilcon has been using telematics on and
off for about four years. Last spring, the
company started using a new telematics
system that allows the company to more
precisely track all 155 vehicles in its fleet and
monitor employee driving habits. Vehicles in
the fleet range from small pickups to large,
heavy-duty work trucks.
Speaking in October, Woodin says Tilcon
is already seeing results. Since June, when
the new program became fully operational,
Tilcon has measured a 20% improvement
overall in driver behavior.
Tilcon set a goal for its drivers to achieve
a daily score of 85 or higher, based on a
100-point scale. "We have many drivers
achieving 100 on a daily basis, which is
awesome," Woodin says.
Tilcon drivers are also following the
posted speed limits, which Woodin says
could be considered unusual for drivers in
most states. Tilcon has programmed its
system to deduct points if a driver exceeds
the speed limit by 8 mph. "Even with this,
our drivers have to contend with others who
believe 15 or 20 mph over the speed limit is
a normal, safe driving habit," Woodin says.
Tilcon's current telematics program is
focusing on key performance indicators,
which include distance driven, speeding of
over 80 mph, speeding of 10 mph over the

posted limit, hard braking, hard acceleration
and idle time.
A driver can lose 15 points for going
10 mph or greater over the posted speed
limit, and 25 points for driving faster than
80 mph. A hard braking or hard acceleration
event can cost a driver another 15 points.
"It's very important to educate drivers
on how to interpret their scores, and also
that the system isn't perfect," Woodin says.
There are times when driver behaviors
like hard braking can't be avoided - such
as when another vehicle is driving carelessly and endangering other vehicles. "We
can only control our own driving behavior,"
Woodin says. "So if you bank good miles
on the highway, you'll reduce the negative
affect of those types of incidents, which
sometimes you can't control."
Idle time is reported but doesn't count
against the driver's overall score. Although
tracking idle time helps Tilcon with efficiency and cost savings. Woodin recognizes that some drivers, such as drivers of
trucks that are equipped with strobe lights,
need to keep their vehicles on to do their
jobs. "We can look at our list and idle time
numbers and know who the exceptions
are," Woodin says.
The telematics devices Tilcon uses gathers data based on every 100 miles traveled
to provide a fair measure of overall driving
performance. The system calculates "good
points" and "bad points" and determines a
driver's final score by subtracting the bad
points from the good points, and then dividing that number by the good points.
When drivers are transferred to another
vehicle, the fleet manager needs to update
the system in a timely manner so the information produced will accurately reflect
their scores.

Healthy competition
among drivers
Tilcon has incorporated its safety recognition program into the telematics tracking
process. Tilcon generates detailed weekly
reports on each driver and posts the reports
for everyone to see. "It's a fundamentally
important part of our process to focus on
CONNstruction / WINTER 2018 / 9



CONNstruction - Winter 2018

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of CONNstruction - Winter 2018

Fleet Tracking with Telematics
Don’t Let Vibration Damages Shake You
Trenching and Excavation Safety
Preventing Runovers and Backovers in Work Zones and Construction Sites
If OSHA Knocks, How Do You Respond?
Diggers Mixers Fixers Golf Outing
2018 AGC/CT Industry Recognition Dinner
Connecticut Road Builder Association Dinner
YCF Yard Goat Baseball/BBQ & Fall Membership Meeting
OSHA-CCIA-ConnOSHA Annual Safety Alliance Conference & Press Conference
A Blue Light for Safety
“If You See Something, Say Something” Applies to More Than Homeland Security
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Intro
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - cover1
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - cover2
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 3
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 4
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 5
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - A Blue Light for Safety
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - “If You See Something, Say Something” Applies to More Than Homeland Security
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Fleet Tracking with Telematics
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 9
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 10
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 11
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Don’t Let Vibration Damages Shake You
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 13
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Trenching and Excavation Safety
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 15
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 16
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 17
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Preventing Runovers and Backovers in Work Zones and Construction Sites
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 19
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 20
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 21
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - If OSHA Knocks, How Do You Respond?
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 23
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 24
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 25
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Diggers Mixers Fixers Golf Outing
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 2018 AGC/CT Industry Recognition Dinner
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - Connecticut Road Builder Association Dinner
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - OSHA-CCIA-ConnOSHA Annual Safety Alliance Conference & Press Conference
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - 30
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - cover3
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - cover4
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - outsert1
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - outsert2
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - outsert3
CONNstruction - Winter 2018 - outsert4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CTCQ/CTCQ0418
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CTCQ/CTCQ0318
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https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CTCQ/CTCQ0416
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https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CTCQ/CTCQ0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CTCQ/CTCQ0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CTCQ/CTCQ0415
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/CTCQ/CTCQ0315
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