BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 45

FEATURE: DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY STRATEGIES

SCALE IT UP:
MONITORING-BASED DEMAND-SIDE
OPERATIONS FOR NYC AGENCIES

O

n a Saturday in early October, on an
open meadow at the Chafee National
Wildlife Refuge in Narragansett,
BY SUSAN COHEN AND
Rhode Island, a long bank of bushes
TAREK M. ARAFAT
intertwined with vines hung heavy
with Concord grapes. Their aroma was divine, but
they were high out of reach. At eye level, nothing
was visible at first. Moving aside some leaves
revealed grapes deep inside the bushes behind
a different kind of vine with steel-like thorns,
no doubt evolution's way of giving birds some
edge over foraging mammals. But then simply
by bending down a bit, one could see, thrillingly,
prized bunches within easy reach: low
hanging fruit.
In the energy world, we hear this metaphor all
the time. It seems there are always 10% to 20%
energy savings possible if easy steps are taken to
get "low hanging fruit." This is perplexing: does
it mean that people are irrational, engaging in
obviously wasteful practices that could be easily
changed? Does it mean that savings are achieved
but keep dissipating and have to be re-harvested
every year? These descriptions do not accurately
describe the world of public sector energy
management - at least not unilaterally. To stay
with the metaphor, the fruit may be low but that
meadow is far away.
Our office, the Division of Energy Management
(DEM) within New York City's Department
of Citywide Administrative Services, pays
for the energy consumed in operating city
government facilities. The facilities themselves
- approximately 4,000 in all - are managed by
the agencies that occupy them: departments
of education, police, fire, sanitation, hospitals,
water treatment plants, libraries and cultural
institutions. With the passage of New York
City's first sustainability plan, PlaNYC, and
its successor, One City Built to Last, DEM was
provided with a program budget to help agencies
meet the energy and greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions reduction goals of these plans. The
City has a long-term GHG emissions reduction
goal of 80% by 2050 (relative to 2005), or "80 x
50", for all sectors; DEM has a nearer-term "35 x
25" goal to help agencies reduce facilities-related

emissions from city government operations.
That goal that was recently reinforced as part
of Mayor de Blasio's Executive Order 26 (EO26),
which commits the City to the Paris Climate
Accord goals. Meeting E026 will require agencies
to reduce energy usage by 20% from
current levels.
Much of DEM's original program focus was
on investments ranging from standard lighting
and boiler upgrades to solar installations and
demonstrations of new technologies. However, it
was always understood that operations-focused
programs, along with staffing and analysis,
would also be required. DEM now provides energy
support staff in larger agencies, oversees energy

FIGURE 1: DCAS ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS
TOWARD MUNICIPAL 35 X 25 GOAL
CREDIT: DIVISION OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT, CITY OF NEW YORK

audits and retro-commissioning and benchmarks
buildings' energy performance. The operations
focus includes training and more robust
preventative maintenance initiatives. (Figure 1)
Another component of of our portfolio is a
rigorous Demand Response (DR) program that
includes real-time metering (RTM) capabilities,
with near-real-time display, for many of the
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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018

From the Executive Director
From the Board Chair
Product Choices for High-Performing Building: Materials Matter
Designing Solar for High-Density Areas
High Performance Building Valuation Techniques
Starting with the End in Mind: Enhanced Turnover for Efficient Building Operations
Behavior Based Strategies and Organizational Change in Commercial & Public Buildings: The Human Component of Energy Efficiency
Commercial HVAC Retrofits That Work
Stretch Codes Emerge as a High Impact Strategy For Energy Savings
Scale it Up: Monitoring-Based Demand-Side Operations for NYC Agencies
The Retrofit Revolution
Index to Advertisers
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - intro
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - From the Executive Director
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - From the Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - Product Choices for High-Performing Building: Materials Matter
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - Designing Solar for High-Density Areas
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 20
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - High Performance Building Valuation Techniques
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - Starting with the End in Mind: Enhanced Turnover for Efficient Building Operations
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - Behavior Based Strategies and Organizational Change in Commercial & Public Buildings: The Human Component of Energy Efficiency
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 34
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - Commercial HVAC Retrofits That Work
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 40
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - Stretch Codes Emerge as a High Impact Strategy For Energy Savings
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 44
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - Scale it Up: Monitoring-Based Demand-Side Operations for NYC Agencies
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 48
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - The Retrofit Revolution
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - insert1
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - insert2
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 54
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - Index to Advertisers
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Spring 2018 - cover4
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