BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 10


FEATURE: EMISSIONS REDUCTION

NEW YORK CITY IS
TRANSFORMING BUILDINGS
FOR A LOW CARBON FUTURE

HOW THE MAYOR'S OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY'S

BUILDING TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP TURNED
BUILDING DATA INTO 80 X 50 INTERVENTIONS
BY LIZ HANSON AND
JOHN LEE

I

n 2014, Mayor Bill de Blasio committed to
reduce New York City's greenhouse gas (GHG)
emissions by 80 percent by 2050 (80x50),
BACKGROUND
becoming the largest city in the world at the
PHOTO CREDIT: JOHN LEE
time to commit to the United Nations' target
for developed nations to keep global temperature rise
below two degrees Celsius. According to the city's
annual Inventory of New York City Greenhouse Gas
Emissions,1 this means cutting 44.6 million metric
tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e) from
2005 levels.
Over the next year, the city conducted the most
comprehensive analysis ever completed on New
York City's building data, with input from more than
50 members of New York City's world-class design,
engineering, affordable housing, labor and real
estate communities. In April 2016, Mayor de Blasio
announced a suite of new initiatives to transition the
city's one million buildings to a low carbon future.2

To lead by
example,
beginning
in 2017, all
new capital
projects for
city-owned
properties
will meet
an energy
performance
target of
50 percent
below
today's
median
energy use.

THE CHALLENGE
New York City has been inventorying GHG emissions
annually since 2007, and has been collecting data on
building energy performance under Local Laws 84
(LL84) and 87 (LL87) since 2009. These laws require
owners and managers of buildings over 50,000 square
feet in floor area to benchmark their energy and water
consumption annually and conduct an energy audit and
retro-commissioning every 10 years. As a result, the city
has one of the most robust datasets of any large city
on its buildings, how they perform and their emissions
at the system level. The annual GHG inventory
consistently shows that the energy used in buildings
contributes nearly three-quarters of citywide GHG
emissions. While New York City's per capita GHGs are
only one-third of the United State average, in order for
the city to meet 80x50, building energy use will have to
drop significantly.

10 * BUILDINGENERGY VOL. 35 NO. 2 | FALL 2016

In early 2015, Mayor de Blasio convened a Buildings
Technical Working Group (TWG) of more than 50
experts and kicked off the study of New York City's
building energy use, utilizing the data from LL84 and
LL87, as well as the city's Green Buildings Law and
other data sources.
TWG members helped determine the leading
edge standards for new construction and substantial
renovations, as well as systems-specific opportunities
for existing buildings to transform the city's building
stock. The group also considered the financial and
regulatory structures that serve as opportunities
and barriers to scaling up energy efficiency and the
operations, maintenance and training needed to
transform the industry.
Twenty-one building typologies, grouped by
age, size and end use, emerged from the data sets,
allowing the city to analyze trends and energy use at
a building system level across similar building types
for the first time. New York City's building stock is
diverse, but distinct trends emerged that help identify
replicable efficiency opportunities. For buildings in
the data set, heating accounts for the largest share
of energy use, followed by domestic hot water (DHW)
production, electric plug loads, lighting and space
cooling.
Overall, heating accounts for more than a third
of energy use in large buildings and more than 40
percent of GHG emissions. For large multifamily
buildings, heating and DHW production, which
typically require burning fossil fuels, account for
more than half of the energy use and nearly threequarters of GHG emissions. In large commercial
buildings, energy use and GHG emissions are more
evenly distributed.
Based on the city's LL87 building system
inventory data, the city determined that more than
70 percent of large buildings use steam heating



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
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