BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16


MULTI-FAMILY, PRE-WAR
UP TO 7 STORIES
This typology includes the most square footage in New York
City after one- to four-family homes. These buildings typically
include one-pipe steam distribution systems with limited or no
controls to provide space heating. Window air conditioners
provide summertime cooling and create window or wall
penetrations and lead to air leakage year-round and a high air
in ltration rate.

Size

12,600 SF average

Height

4 Stories + 1 Below-grade

Baseline Conditions
Wall Construction: Mass wall (R-5)
Roof: Insulation above deck (R-12)
Lighting: 0.40Watts/SF
Plug Loads: 0.55 Watts/SF
Heating System: Dual fuel boiler, 1-Pipe Steam
Cooling System: Window A/C
DHW System: Indirect coil in steam boiler
Efficiency Measures Applied to All Paths

Path Source EUI Reduction (kBtu/SF)

109.4

Lighting: Reduce LPD
Plug loads: Master switching; Smart plugs; Replace appliances
DHW: Install low flow fixtures; Condensing gas boiler
BMS/EMS: Controls to provide indoor feedback and implement setbacks
Ventilation: Unitized through-wall exhaust ventilation

Path 1
Efficient Systems
Optimized best in class natural
gas steam boiler and steam
distribution
ENERGY STAR A/C
Solar PV on 25% of the roof

Path 3
Electrification
Remove window A/C
Air source heat pump with
minisplits for heating and
cooling
Solar thermal for 50% of the
DHW load

61.9 to
79.1

58.0 to
74.4

50.1 to
66.4

48.2 to
64.6

Path #3

Path #4

Path 2
Hydronic Conversion
Remove Window A/C
Water source heat pump with
gas boiler and air cooled
condenser for heating and
cooling
Solar PV on 25% of the roof
Path 4
Electrification + Re-cladding
Re-clad 100% of facade
Remove window A/C
Air source heat pump with
minisplits for heating and
cooling
Solar thermal for 50% of the
DHW load

Baseline

Path #1

Path #2

Path GHG Emissions Reduction (MtCO2e)

63
30 to
40 26 to
34

26 to
36

19 to 20 to
27
27
13 to
15

Baseline Path #1

#1 +
Clean
Grid

Path #2

#2 +
Clean
Grid

Path #3

#3 +
Clean
Grid

20 to
26

Path #4

EXAMPLE RETROFIT PATH ANALYSIS: MULTIFAMILY, PRE-WAR, UP TO 7 STORIES. SOURCE: ONE CITY BUILT TO LAST
TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP REPORT: TRANSFORMING NEW YORK CITY BUILDINGS FOR A LOW-CARBON FUTURE.

Use Benchmarking ordinance and requirement for energy
audits in NYC's largest buildings. John formerly held a
seat on the New York State Uniform Code Council as the
Mayor's representative, and has led numerous studies,
stakeholder engagement, and publications related to
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
buildings and climate change mitigation. He is a licensed
John Lee is the Deputy Director for Green Buildings
architect and a graduate of Rice University and Harvard
and Energy Efficiency at the NYC Mayor's Office of
University. Don't miss his session, "Empowering NYC to
Sustainability. He is leading the city's policy and
Fight Climate Change and Thrive," at the BuildingEnergy
legislative efforts driving the built environment to
NYC Conference + Trade Show, Nov. 3, 2016, at the TKP
reach its greenhouse gas reduction targets through
MEMBER
programs and policies including the Energy and Water Center in Manhattan.
Accelerator's High Performance Retrofit Track,
will set the city on the road towards deep carbon
reductions.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

16 * BUILDINGENERGY VOL. 35 NO. 2 | FALL 2016

13 to
15

#4 +
Clean
Grid



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 64
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 66
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 68
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
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