BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41


It is one thing to be able to measure the impact
that individual building occupants have on energy
performance. It is quite another to get them to care
about their impact. Getting buy-in from occupants
has traditionally been one of the harder aspects of
successful energy projects. It has been difficult to
communicate the overall impact individual users are
making to a building, and once that is communicated,
the question really becomes "Well, what can I do
about it?" Historically, individual settings were hardly
customizable, spaces were not controllable down
to the individual user level, and it was difficult to
measure incremental changes in behavior that impact
energy use.
Today, we have a wide range of easily deployable
and cost-effective technologies that enable us to
address these challenges and engage occupants in
ways that were impossible before. One means of
doing so is through the following three-step process
to improve occupant behavior:
1. Empower occupants with data and tools that shed
light on their behavior and its impact.
2. Encourage positive behaviors with gamification
strategies.
3. Fine tune tools and programs and encourage their
continued use.
EMPOWER WITH DATA AND TOOLS
Knowledge is power: Effective sub-metering
has allowed us to easily create building-level
energy dashboards. This gives the occupants a
holistic view of the general health of the building.
We have compared overall consumption and
savings to the number of vehicle miles driven or
average number of trees planted in order to make
them more relatable to building occupants. We
can now sub-meter down to the floor level and
even down to individual occupant level. Whether
through
clamp-on current transformer-style connected
meters or other readily available, cost-effective
sub-metering technologies, we can empower
occupants with a clear picture of how much energy
they use at a given moment and over the course of
the month and year.
A modern BAS serves as the central nervous
system of a building, and can easily integrate
with IoT-enabled devices, including lighting and
daylighting systems, occupancy sensors and
electrical distribution systems. It is important
to track all of these systems in a central location
that is accessible by both building management
and occupants.
Effectively designed spaces: We can control
our individual light levels, temperatures and
ventilation requirements using a modern BAS
to refine control to very specific user-defined
zones. It is important to plan for this discrete

level of controllability throughout the design and
construction phases of the building. The design
team must be aware of the need for individual
occupants or small groups of occupants to control
various aspects of their energy usage. Integrated
Project Delivery (IPD) methodology has been
proven successful in a few recent high performance
buildings. This design philosophy brings together
ownership, design and construction teams to deliver
exceptionally user friendly spaces.
Encourage positive behaviors with gamification
strategies: When we have successfully empowered
our occupants with knowledge and tools and have
their attention, it is important to implement
engaging programs to keep their attention and
enthusiasm. Creating an atmosphere of friendly
competition among individual occupants as well
as department or floor level users is key, since it
changes the dynamic from "something else I have
to do," to encouraging participation. Gamification
strategies allow building managers to incentivize all
stakeholders to participate, by creating a sense of
ownership or the idea that "there's something in it
for me."
One large commercial office building in New
York City provides a tenant portal to their BAS
which, on its main screen, displays that tenant's
energy profile in real time and compares it to other
tenants in the building. Tenants are incentivized
to outperform one another for small scale rewards
like catered lunches, gift cards and other prizes,
fostering an atmosphere of healthy competition.
While the costs of implementing such measures
vary, interviews with building managers suggest
significant improvements in tenant engagement,
and ultimately reduce energy use.

SUGGESTIONS FOR
ENGAGING OCCUPANTS
A handful of buildings in New York City that currently engage occupants in
this way have used the following specific suggestions to engage occupants
on an individual level.
1. Computer monitor: Harvard University's Office of Sustainability suggests that
a barely noticeable 30 percent reduction in monitor brightness reduces energy
consumption by as much as 20 percent.
2. Individual room light settings: a 20 percent reduction in brightness levels can
reduce energy consumption by as much as 40 percent.
3. Raise temperature requirements in individual units: Turning up the
thermostat in the summer months, from an average of 72°F to 74°F, alleviates
a tremendous amount of cooling load, improving your individual PEI by as
much as 30 percent.
NESEA.ORG * 41


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0215
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