BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 25

FIGURE 2: A MATRIX SHOWING HAZARDS EVALUATED AND RESILIENT DESIGN STRATEGIES IMPLEMENTED BY THE DESIGN TEAMS ON THREE
NEW ENGLAND INSTITUTIONAL PROJECTS, ORGANIZED BY THE CREDIT STRUCTURE OF THE LEED PILOT CREDITS ON RESILIENT DESIGN.
PHOTO CREDIT: WILSON ARCHITECTS. PHOTOS © WILSON ARCHITECTS.

directs teams to look for local data but provides resources for
national data and identifies thresholds to determine if you are low,
medium or high risk.
At Wilson Architects, we developed a matrix (Figure 2) to track
and compare data for the case studies. We used the matrix to
track different projects, and it could also be used to track site or
design options. We found that, driven by building codes, natural
hazards with regional impacts like high wind and earthquakes
seem to be well known and generally addressed in projects.
However, hazards that could impact smaller areas, such as drought
and urban flooding, are not well represented. We found a similar
situation with climate change hazards. Regional hazards were
well known but the hazards applicable at a finer grain are less
well-understood.
The three projects we evaluated in our case studies (shown
in the Figure 2 matrix) are institutional projects located in New
England where we led the design team. They all happen to be built
on urban landfill (land "reclaimed" from tidal waters), so the effects
of climate change hazards such as sea level rise and more frequent
and intense storms rose to the top of our list of concerns. From
our assessment, the top hazards for our two waterfront projects
were high winds associated with hurricanes and winter storms, and
the accompanying storm surge flooding, sometimes with wave
action (Figures 3 & 4). We also learned that the densely developed
urban sites, built on land reclaimed from a tidal river, came with

their own surprise hazards not always found on a FEMA FIRM
flood map - urban flooding. These urban flooding risks are related
to the hardscaping our cities and campuses, aging storm-water
infrastructure and the effects of climate change. This discovery
came from deeper analysis and understanding of the development
and infrastructure history of a site. Local studies, in our case
Climate Ready Boston and the City of Cambridge's Climate Change
Vulnerability Assessment, provided an invaluable starting point for
assessing the vulnerabilities of our project sites.
CREDIT IPpc99: APPROACH
Once identified, hazards need to be addressed. IPpc99 Design
for Enhanced Resilience provides direction for mitigating the
identified risks and points to quantifiable goals for mitigation.
For the projects that we evaluated, we found that the owners
and design teams were aware of the highest risk hazards and were
planning for the current case; the expected service lives of the
projects we looked at are all 50 to 100+ years.
Climate change is a moving target - the further out you look, the
greater the delta. As a result, the teams may have underestimated
hazards for the entire 100-year life cycle of their buildings.
A benefit of the pilot credits is that they provide an educated
starting point - because you have to start somewhere. The
pilot credits guide project teams in making assumptions while
CONTINUED ON PAGE 27

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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017

From the Executive Director: A strategic plan for emerging professionals.
From the Board Chair: Taking flight into new territory.
What is Strategic Electrification? Simply Put, It’s an Energy Transformation: A core pathway to deep carbon reduction.
Better Steam Heat: Generating steam system upgrades in New York City.
Going All the Way:What it will really take to achieve net zero energy in Burlington, VT.
Are You Forging the Weakest Link?: A deeper dive into how the quest for resilience alters the design process.
Air Quality in Your Bedroom: Nighttime Carbon Dioxide Levels in the Bedrooms of 22 Vermont Homes: Can occupants of leaky houses breathe easy in their sleep?
Inclusive Diversity Key to Sustainability: Opinion: Sustainability planning must embrace diversity.
BuildingEnergy Bottom Lines: An interview with Jonathan Orpin.
High Performance Walls: Discover an alternative to traditional insulation methods that can reach superior insulation performance with thinner walls.
SAF®– A Solar Faade to Stay?: A technical overview of the newest attachment systems in the low-energy construction market.
NESEA Green Pages: This premier resource for sustainability professionals in the Northeast and beyond is just a few pages away. To have your business listed in next year’s Green Pages and become a NESEA business member today, visit nesea.org/join.
Index to Advertisers
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Intro
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - From the Executive Director: A strategic plan for emerging professionals.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - From the Board Chair: Taking flight into new territory.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - What is Strategic Electrification? Simply Put, It’s an Energy Transformation: A core pathway to deep carbon reduction.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Better Steam Heat: Generating steam system upgrades in New York City.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Going All the Way:What it will really take to achieve net zero energy in Burlington, VT.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Are You Forging the Weakest Link?: A deeper dive into how the quest for resilience alters the design process.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 26
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Air Quality in Your Bedroom: Nighttime Carbon Dioxide Levels in the Bedrooms of 22 Vermont Homes: Can occupants of leaky houses breathe easy in their sleep?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Inclusive Diversity Key to Sustainability: Opinion: Sustainability planning must embrace diversity.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - BuildingEnergy Bottom Lines: An interview with Jonathan Orpin.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - High Performance Walls: Discover an alternative to traditional insulation methods that can reach superior insulation performance with thinner walls.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 40
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - SAF®– A Solar Faade to Stay?: A technical overview of the newest attachment systems in the low-energy construction market.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 44
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - NESEA Green Pages: This premier resource for sustainability professionals in the Northeast and beyond is just a few pages away. To have your business listed in next year’s Green Pages and become a NESEA business member today, visit nesea.org/join.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 49
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT4
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Index to Advertisers
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert6
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