BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 29

Jim Newman is Founder and Principal at Linnean
Solutions, which provides environmental analytics and
benchmarking for corporate, institutional and municipal
clients. Linnean's work includes resilience analysis and
planning, ecosystem services assessment, life cycle
assessment and embodied carbon studies. This work
is embodied in Living Building Challenge consulting,
EcoDistrict planning and management, and stakeholder
engagement processes to strengthen communities.
Previous to Linnean, Jim worked with BuildingGreen as
the Director of Strategy, where he led the development
and introduction of most of BuildingGreen's online
products including LEEDuser.com, BuildingGreen Suite
and the High Performance Buildings Database.
Katie Courtney of Wilson Architects draws on over
13 years of experience with complex projects for academic,
commercial and life science clients. She brings an inclusive,
hands-on approach to the design process, and is known
for thoughtful, enduring and sustainable solutions that
connect people and spaces. Katie has a long-standing
interest in Resilient Design, attended the 2015 FEMA
HURRIPLAN training in Gloucester, MA, and presented
at NESEA's BuildingEnergy Boston 2017 Conference.
Katie earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the
University of Notre Dame and is licensed in Massachusetts.
Marcell Graeff of Wilson Architects draws on 20 years
of experience with complex projects for K-12 and higher
education clients. Marcell has a long-standing interest
in sustainable design with a focus on high-performance
building envelopes, healthy building materials and
renewable energy. Marcell earned a Bachelor of
Architecture from Syracuse University and presented at
the BuildingEnergy Boston Conference in 2017.
ABOUT THE PEER REVIEWER
Matthew Broderick, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C, is
an Architect and Principal at Ashley McGraw Architects
(ashleymcgraw.com) where he leads the Higher Education
studio. He has worked on many sustainable, aspirational
projects, including multiple LEED Gold buildings. He is
currently working on a Living Building Challenge project
at Binghamton University which is also targeting Passive
House certification. Matt's firm recently joined the
BuildingEnergy Bottom Lines program.
BUSINESS MEMBER

STEVE BEINHORN
(OWNER)

873409_Imprints.indd 1

There are lot of new ideas introduced in the LEED pilot
credits on Resilient Design, but the most groundbreaking
idea is that of "thermal habitability." As BuildingGreen and
the Resilient Design Institute (RDI) have been arguing since
Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast in 2005, we as
designers and buildings should be thinking about whether
a building will maintain livable temperatures should it lose
power for an extended period of time.
Thermal habitability is one of the measures that falls under
the Passive Survivability pilot credit (IPpc100), along with
backup power. While there has long been an understanding that
a better-insulated building envelope will keep occupants safer
should there be an extended power outage, Pilot Credit 100
provides a methodology for measuring this aspect of resilience.
The revised version of Pilot Credit 100 (v.2) provides two
methods for modeling the thermal habitability of a building.
The first method defines a "habitability zone" of 54°F to
86°F, based on standard effective temperature (SET), rather
than simply air temperature, and defines the number of
degree-hours during summer and winter design weeks that
can fall outside of that zone. (SET is a temperature metric that
factors in relative humidity and mean radiant temperature, in
addition to air temperature. (Figures 5 & 6, page 28).
The other metric uses methodology from ASHRAE Standard
55 to show that conditions will remain within a band on the
psychrometric chart during summer and winter design weeks
that can be reasonably considered to represent habitability
conditions. Note that this band of temperature and humidity
conditions is far different from the more commonly referenced
comfort zone.
While the Resilience Working Group has sought to define
thermal habitability through the LEED pilot credits on Resilient
Design, a similar effort is underway at the Passive House
Institute U.S. (PHIUS). The PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building
Standard does a good job of demonstrating that a building
will maintain habitable temperatures in the event of a power
outage. This certification will likely become a third compliance
option for satisfying the thermal habitability requirement in
LEED Pilot Credit 100.

SOLAR/PHOTOVOLTAIC LABELS
TAMPER EVIDENT LABELS
REFLECTIVE DECALS
EQUIPMENT LABELS

P.O. BOX 68477, Oro Valley, AZ 85737

TOLL FREE: 866-487-9339
PH: 727-535-9492
FAX: 727-499-9501
EMAIL: steve@imprints.com
WEB: www.imprints.com

THERMAL HABITABILITY

ALL LABELS
DURABLE
WEATHERPROOF
NUMBERED/BARCODED
SPECIALTY MATERIALS

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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017

From the Executive Director: A strategic plan for emerging professionals.
From the Board Chair: Taking flight into new territory.
What is Strategic Electrification? Simply Put, It’s an Energy Transformation: A core pathway to deep carbon reduction.
Better Steam Heat: Generating steam system upgrades in New York City.
Going All the Way:What it will really take to achieve net zero energy in Burlington, VT.
Are You Forging the Weakest Link?: A deeper dive into how the quest for resilience alters the design process.
Air Quality in Your Bedroom: Nighttime Carbon Dioxide Levels in the Bedrooms of 22 Vermont Homes: Can occupants of leaky houses breathe easy in their sleep?
Inclusive Diversity Key to Sustainability: Opinion: Sustainability planning must embrace diversity.
BuildingEnergy Bottom Lines: An interview with Jonathan Orpin.
High Performance Walls: Discover an alternative to traditional insulation methods that can reach superior insulation performance with thinner walls.
SAF®– A Solar Faade to Stay?: A technical overview of the newest attachment systems in the low-energy construction market.
NESEA Green Pages: This premier resource for sustainability professionals in the Northeast and beyond is just a few pages away. To have your business listed in next year’s Green Pages and become a NESEA business member today, visit nesea.org/join.
Index to Advertisers
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Intro
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - From the Executive Director: A strategic plan for emerging professionals.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - From the Board Chair: Taking flight into new territory.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - What is Strategic Electrification? Simply Put, It’s an Energy Transformation: A core pathway to deep carbon reduction.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Better Steam Heat: Generating steam system upgrades in New York City.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Going All the Way:What it will really take to achieve net zero energy in Burlington, VT.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Are You Forging the Weakest Link?: A deeper dive into how the quest for resilience alters the design process.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 26
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Air Quality in Your Bedroom: Nighttime Carbon Dioxide Levels in the Bedrooms of 22 Vermont Homes: Can occupants of leaky houses breathe easy in their sleep?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Inclusive Diversity Key to Sustainability: Opinion: Sustainability planning must embrace diversity.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - BuildingEnergy Bottom Lines: An interview with Jonathan Orpin.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - High Performance Walls: Discover an alternative to traditional insulation methods that can reach superior insulation performance with thinner walls.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 40
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - SAF®– A Solar Faade to Stay?: A technical overview of the newest attachment systems in the low-energy construction market.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 44
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - NESEA Green Pages: This premier resource for sustainability professionals in the Northeast and beyond is just a few pages away. To have your business listed in next year’s Green Pages and become a NESEA business member today, visit nesea.org/join.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 49
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT4
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Index to Advertisers
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert6
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