BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 45

FIGURE 7: NET POSITIVE ENERGY PROJECT
(121 PERCENT), HOFBERG 8 (2016) IN WIL, CANTON OF
ST. GALLEN, SWITZERLAND WITH SAF® E3. MINERGIE-P
CERTIFIED (SG-125-P).
ARCHITECTURE BY FENT SOLARE ARCHITEKTUR.
PHOTO CREDIT: LUCIDO SOLAR AG.

FIGURE 8: NET POSITIVE ENERGY PROJECT "CHALET IN NAX," IN NAX, CANTON OF
VALAIS, SWITZERLAND.
ARCHITECTURE BY GROUPE H, MEYRIN, SWITZERLAND.
WOOD ENGINEERING BY CHARPENTE CONCEPT SA, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND.
PHOTO CREDIT: LUCIDO SOLAR AG.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 43

for Excellence and one (Hofberg 6/7) even received
the European Norman Foster Solar Award in 2012
(Figures 5, 6 and 7).
Since the very first SAF® project in 1999 the system
has been successfully adapted by many green architects
in over a hundred commercial, institutional and
residential buildings in Switzerland and surrounding
countries.
SWISS CHALET
SAF® can be produced by locally contracted
manufacturers using locally harvested wood. The value
of SAF® lies not just in its performance abilities but also
in the fact that it can be produced with local renewable
resources, keeping the value chain local. It is eco-friendly
and carbon neutral. This chalet in Nax (Figure 8), is a
perfect example of the vision that drives this invention.
It is a net-positive energy and carbon building that can
cover its own energy demands as well as the fuel for an
electric vehicle to drive 15,000 to 18,000 miles a year.

solar energy usage and an active measure of controlling
its distribution. This triple absorption of solar energy
provides a thermal buffer (mass) around the building,
waste heat that is extracted from the air gap through a
connecting duct system and led into the heat exchanger
of a heat pump and renewable electricity to power the
heat pump and the rest of the house/facility and/or car
(Figure 9). Furthermore, by funneling the sun-warmed
air from the air gap into a closed duct system one can
mechanically increase or decrease the airflow rate in the
air gap, actively cooling down or heating up the thermal
buffer and the PV cells. This shifts the energy efficiency
more toward the PV power production or the thermal
mass all depending on the seasonal and diurnal needs of
the building occupants.

LIMITATIONS
While the material and architectural qualities of glass
and wood are undeniable, there are also some limitations.
The smoothness and hardness of the glass makes it very
durable. The glass in this system is typically a single-pane
tempered safety glass, and is very impact resistant.
FUTURE OF SAF®
Nevertheless, the chance of breakage through impact
SAF®'s passive solar thermal system can be
cannot be completely eliminated. Tall buildings may
enhanced by integrating photovoltaic technology in a
semi-transparent fashion into the outer glass cover. The require laminated safety glass for human safety instead.
wood core absorbs both direct sunlight and indirect heat Dust and dirt may accumulate on the surface over time
radiating off the back of the PV cells. While the thermal but there is no need for active cleaning because the rain
performance may be slightly reduced, the added benefit washes excessive dirt away and minimizes any impact on
of producing renewable electricity increases the overall its performance.
The drawback of the wood is that it is combustible
ratio of solar energy used. It is therefore possible to
and therefore subject to fire code restrictions, especially
cover the entire energy demand of a building with a
single system, especially on taller buildings with a much in the commercial building applications. However,
in Switzerland, where similar restrictions exist,
bigger fa ade-to-roof surface ratio.
solutions have been devised to make SAF fire code
Finally SAF® e3 marks the next generation in
compliant. The tallest building to date is a seven-story
the system's technology by adding a third layer of
NESEA.ORG * 45


http://www.NESEA.ORG

BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017

From the Executive Director: A strategic plan for emerging professionals.
From the Board Chair: Taking flight into new territory.
What is Strategic Electrification? Simply Put, It’s an Energy Transformation: A core pathway to deep carbon reduction.
Better Steam Heat: Generating steam system upgrades in New York City.
Going All the Way:What it will really take to achieve net zero energy in Burlington, VT.
Are You Forging the Weakest Link?: A deeper dive into how the quest for resilience alters the design process.
Air Quality in Your Bedroom: Nighttime Carbon Dioxide Levels in the Bedrooms of 22 Vermont Homes: Can occupants of leaky houses breathe easy in their sleep?
Inclusive Diversity Key to Sustainability: Opinion: Sustainability planning must embrace diversity.
BuildingEnergy Bottom Lines: An interview with Jonathan Orpin.
High Performance Walls: Discover an alternative to traditional insulation methods that can reach superior insulation performance with thinner walls.
SAF®– A Solar Faade to Stay?: A technical overview of the newest attachment systems in the low-energy construction market.
NESEA Green Pages: This premier resource for sustainability professionals in the Northeast and beyond is just a few pages away. To have your business listed in next year’s Green Pages and become a NESEA business member today, visit nesea.org/join.
Index to Advertisers
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Intro
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - From the Executive Director: A strategic plan for emerging professionals.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - From the Board Chair: Taking flight into new territory.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - What is Strategic Electrification? Simply Put, It’s an Energy Transformation: A core pathway to deep carbon reduction.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Better Steam Heat: Generating steam system upgrades in New York City.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Going All the Way:What it will really take to achieve net zero energy in Burlington, VT.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Are You Forging the Weakest Link?: A deeper dive into how the quest for resilience alters the design process.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 26
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Air Quality in Your Bedroom: Nighttime Carbon Dioxide Levels in the Bedrooms of 22 Vermont Homes: Can occupants of leaky houses breathe easy in their sleep?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Inclusive Diversity Key to Sustainability: Opinion: Sustainability planning must embrace diversity.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - BuildingEnergy Bottom Lines: An interview with Jonathan Orpin.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - High Performance Walls: Discover an alternative to traditional insulation methods that can reach superior insulation performance with thinner walls.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 40
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - SAF®– A Solar Faade to Stay?: A technical overview of the newest attachment systems in the low-energy construction market.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 44
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - NESEA Green Pages: This premier resource for sustainability professionals in the Northeast and beyond is just a few pages away. To have your business listed in next year’s Green Pages and become a NESEA business member today, visit nesea.org/join.
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 50
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - INSERT4
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - Index to Advertisers
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - cover4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2017 - outsert6
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