Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 26

Figure 2. Trend for a chiller
Determining these in advance will help
the BAS design engineer and HVAC
technicians now and in the future.
Avoid equipment names associated
with hospital departments or areas, as
department names and areas change
frequently in this environment.
Important factors-including
detailed, specific control drawings and
sequences of operations-must be
considered during the early stages of
the design process. The end goal is a
comprehensive and customized set of
"future-proof" specifications for the
facility. An additional consideration is
whether simulation mode is available
for the programmer to test a sequence
of operations before commissioning or
initiating equipment.
Most facility staffs are not blessed with
a static building that remains unchanged
from the day it was built. New wings or
buildings are added, which can result
in several generations of technology
and hardware scattered throughout the
facility. A building automation system
needs to be able to integrate all the
different generations of technology
to be a truly useful tool in the facility
staff's arsenal. Pay attention to new
and emerging technologies in the
field and select a BAS that is capable of
assimilating new technologies into the
current BAS as easily as possible.
The focus has changed over the
years from strictly a comfort focus or a
compliant focus to an efficiency focus.
Because of this and the fact that no two
buildings are the same, having a BAS
26 INSIDE ASHE | FALL 2017

Important factors-
including detailed,
specific control
drawings and
sequences of
operations-must be
considered during
the early stages of
the design process.
that is customizable is vital. While basic
programs, such as keeping the discharge
air temperature at 55°F, are a starting
point, they are only that: a starting point.
Facility staff must be able to customize
these programs to consider other key
information to complete night setbacks,
temperature setpoint resets, air changes
per hour resets, and more to keep the
building compliant, comfortable, and
energy efficient.

Energy savings
Building automation systems are
essential for generating energy savings
throughout a facility. The BAS can be
used to implement programming and
monitor equipment to ensure energy
is not being wasted. Implementing
occupied and unoccupied schedules
for areas like offices or classrooms is
an economical way to save energy. In a

system using variable airflow volume
(VAV) terminal units and variable
frequency drives (VFDs), unoccupied
setpoints can reduce the minimum
airflow from the VAV units, allowing
the static pressure critical zone reset
algorithm to lower the static pressure
setpoint, which allows the VFD to
decrease the fan speed. Based on the
third fan law, for every percent a fan's
speed is reduced, the energy savings is
cubed. Consider a typical VFD operating
at 60 Hz. A 10 percent reduction takes
the speed down to 54 Hz. This doesn't
seem like a big difference; however,
54 Hz consumes 30 percent less energy
than 60 Hz.
In addition to implementing control
sequences, the BAS is a valuable tool
for monitoring systems and equipment.
For example, chillers have the potential
to be huge energy wasters. Using the
BAS trending functions can help facility
managers quickly spot problems like
frequent starts and stops. Figure 2 is
an example of a trend for a chiller. A
properly designed BAS can also provide
the facility manager with daily electric
and natural gas consumption trending
that supports best practice energy
saving strategies.

Summary
Choosing the right building
automation system can be
overwhelming, but creating a
comprehensive plan to ensure that key
factors are considered can be extremely
beneficial. When creating a plan,
carefully assess the facility's existing
state, the needs of the facility staff,
and regulatory compliance. The BAS
can make regulatory compliance much
simpler by including requirements in
the system itself. You may have the most
energy efficient equipment available,
but a poorly designed and programmed
BAS will result in poor performance.
Conversely, a well-designed system
will squeeze optimal performance
and efficiency out of any equipment.
Remember, the reward of having
comfortable patients and staff, a
streamlined maintenance program, and
energy savings will far outweigh the
struggle of finding the right building
automation system.



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Inside ASHE - Fall 2017

Letter from the president
What’s new
Pop quiz
The measurement of a health care facility manager: How do you define success?
Creating a program to identify and monitor pressure dependent spaces
Critical considerations for specifying a building automation system for health care
Bright ideas: LED renovation at Boulder Community Health
Selecting the right fire extinguisher for operating rooms
Still battling reheat energy in hospitals: Short- and long-term ideas for hospitals’ biggest energy use
The financial impact of variable speed ventilation controls in hospital kitchens
Data driven culture fuels University of Florida Health’s success in energy and operational optimization
Energy management in a critical access hospital: How Barnesville Hospital reduced energy consumption by 39 percent
Value analysis: Improving operating margin through cost savings
Member spotlight
Advertisers’ index
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Intro
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - bellyband1
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - bellyband2
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - cover1
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - cover2
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 3
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 4
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 5
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 6
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 7
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 8
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Letter from the president
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - What’s new
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 11
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Pop quiz
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 13
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 14
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 15
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 16
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 17
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - The measurement of a health care facility manager: How do you define success?
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 19
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Creating a program to identify and monitor pressure dependent spaces
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 21
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 22
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 23
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Critical considerations for specifying a building automation system for health care
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 25
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 26
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 27
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Bright ideas: LED renovation at Boulder Community Health
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 29
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 30
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 31
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 32
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 33
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Selecting the right fire extinguisher for operating rooms
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 35
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 36
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 37
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 38
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 39
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 40
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 41
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Still battling reheat energy in hospitals: Short- and long-term ideas for hospitals’ biggest energy use
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 43
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 44
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 45
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - The financial impact of variable speed ventilation controls in hospital kitchens
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 47
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 48
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 49
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 50
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 51
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Data driven culture fuels University of Florida Health’s success in energy and operational optimization
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 53
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 54
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 55
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Energy management in a critical access hospital: How Barnesville Hospital reduced energy consumption by 39 percent
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 57
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Value analysis: Improving operating margin through cost savings
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 59
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Member spotlight
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Advertisers’ index
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 62
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - cover3
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - cover4
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - outsert1
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - outsert2
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 70
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 71
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 72
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 73
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 74
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 75
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