Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 62

Continued from page 39

Pet owners concerned about coyotes getting into yards and harming pets are best off
building a wood, vinyl, or chain link fence, Walsh says. Coyotes can easily jump over a
five-foot-high fence, so fences should be built at a minimum height of six feet. Coyotes will
also dig very deep to access a yard, so it's best to install fences six inches to a foot deep.

a brand new ornamental fence," he says.
"PupProtect panels also are nearly impossible to chew through, so you don't have to
worry about your dog chewing through one
and escaping, or bending or breaking it by
pushing and jumping on it."
For a dog that chews, vinyl or metal will
be the best option as wood tends to crack
and splinter which could result in splinters in the dog's mouth and throat, Walsh
says. Chain link and ornamental fencing
are nearly impossible to chew through, and
won't cause any harm to dogs.
"If you're looking for privacy, vinyl fences
don't have chemicals like pressure treated
wooden fences do, nor do they have the danger of splintering or shattering," he says.
"Pieces are also easily removed and replaced
which makes repairs easy."
Jewett-Cameron's Euro Design welded
panels are "virtually chew-proof," and
second best are the two-inch by four-inch
welded-wire mesh modular panels, Huff
says. The company's kennels and panels do
not have any plastic parts or connectors to
break, splinter or be chewed.
For dogs that like to dig, a small trench
three-inch to four-inch deep filled with
chicken wire or a wooden board will prevent minor-moderate diggers from getting
under, Walsh says.
"If your dog is still managing to escape,
you may need to deepen the trench, or place
dense bushes in front of the fence line to
provide a visual barrier between your dog
and the bottom of the fence," he says.
A mow strip will often help solve the problem for dogs that like to dig, Larsen says. For
chewers, heavier gauge and harder materials
like steel will help. Most dogs respect the
boundary, but if a pet is aggressively trying to get through the enclosure it can be
more of a training and behavior problem.

"If they perceive a weakness at a point in the
fence they tend to go for that spot or dig in
the spot with the greatest gap beneath the
fence," he says. "I've seen reports of pets
gravely injured on sharp wire ends of light
gauge chain link wire when they chew it and
it unravels, so it is all the more important
to match the strength of the fence with the
resolve of the pet."
Pet owners concerned about coyotes getting into yards and harming pets are best
off building a wood, vinyl, or chain link
fence, Walsh says. Coyotes can easily jump
over a five-foot-high fence, so fences should
be built at a minimum height of six feet.
Coyotes will also dig very deep to access a
yard, so it's best to install fences six inches
to a foot deep.
"I always tell people that if a rabbit or
a coyote wants to get into your yard they
will find a way," he says. "The main preventative measure is to not become a food
source. If there's only a barking animal in
the yard they are much less likely to try and
get access than if there is a pile of dog food
sitting outside."
Jewett-Cameron's Animal House system
of welded-wire modular panels is perfectly
suited for keeping small animals safe from
wildlife, Huff says.
"You can build your structure with a top
as well as with a floor panel to keep pets
in, predators out," she says. "The smaller
wire spacing and thicker gauge wire makes
it almost impossible for pets or wildlife to
chew through. Our welded-wire modular
kennels can also be assembled with a predator protection top."
Off-leash dog parks typically have fences
that are four feet to five feet high and aren't
necessarily meant to be secure and impossible to breach or escape from, Walsh says.
They are designed to keep small dogs in and
www.americanfenceassociation.com | 62 | March/April 2018

provide a barrier to keep dogs corralled,
rather than trapped.
"I see dogs all the time in my local parks
which could easily jump the fence but are
too distracted with other dogs and playing
than getting outside the barrier," he says.
"When a dog is by itself in a backyard they
are much more likely to try and escape by
any means, so proper training, adequate
fence design, toys, and frequent walks should
all be combined to keep your active pooch
healthy, happy, and safe."
Larsen Innovations once had a customer
modify one of its kennels with lockable casters on the bottom, and a wire top because
there were coyotes in the area.
"They wanted to be able to roll the kennel up to the doggy door on their patio
while they were at work to allow their small
dogs to go outside during the day and still
be able to move it out of the way easily,"
Larsen says.
Walsh had one client who requested a
fence capable of keeping their dog and pet
guinea pig from escaping their backyard. For
another customer, Rite-Way installed twoinch by four-inch security mesh around a
1,500-foot perimeter acreage to prevent puppies from escaping. The company has also
built multiple dog runs with roofs, including a 66-foot-long by eight-foot-wide dog
run out of wood with a chain link roof for
a police canine unit dog.
Other ways to prevent small animals
escaping or entering include installing
chicken wire in the ground, installing a section of PVC pipe along the top of wooden
fences to stop animals from getting their
front legs hooked over the top board and
pulling themselves up, landscaping rough
yards to make them flat or building retaining walls and installing fence on top of them,
Walsh says.


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Fencepost - March/April 2018

EDITOR’S NOTE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE
PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS | CHAPTER PRESIDENTS COMMITTEE
FENCELINES
IN MEMORIAM
FENCE PROFESSIONALS FLOCK TO PHOENIX FOR FENCETECH 2018
ON THE FENCE
MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
CANINE CRIBS
SAFETY IN PARADISE
AFA BESTOWS TOP HONORS AT FENCETECH 2018
VMA
WORKPLACE RESOLUTIONS FOR THE NEW YEAR
MEMBER SAVINGS PROGRAM
NEW MEMBERS
MEMBERS ON THE MOVE
CALENDAR
CHAPTER NEWS
INDEX TO ADVERTISERS
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - Intro
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - cover1
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - cover2
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 3
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 4
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 5
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 6
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 7
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 8
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 9
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 10
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 11
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 12
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - EDITOR’S NOTE
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 14
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 16
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 18
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS | CHAPTER PRESIDENTS COMMITTEE
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - FENCELINES
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 21
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 22
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 23
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 24
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 25
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - IN MEMORIAM
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 27
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - FENCE PROFESSIONALS FLOCK TO PHOENIX FOR FENCETECH 2018
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 29
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - ON THE FENCE
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 31
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 32
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 33
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 34
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 35
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 37
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - CANINE CRIBS
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 39
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - SAFETY IN PARADISE
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 41
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 42
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 43
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 44
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 45
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - AFA BESTOWS TOP HONORS AT FENCETECH 2018
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 47
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 48
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 49
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 50
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 51
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 52
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - VMA
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - WORKPLACE RESOLUTIONS FOR THE NEW YEAR
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 55
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 56
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 57
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 58
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - MEMBER SAVINGS PROGRAM
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - NEW MEMBERS
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 61
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 62
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - CALENDAR
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - CHAPTER NEWS
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - 65
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - INDEX TO ADVERTISERS
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - cover3
Fencepost - March/April 2018 - cover4
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