Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 23

"The non-climb woven wire fence will
also work great for a lot of other types of
animals like sheep, goats, chickens, you
name it," Fisher says.
The most common type of post the
contractor uses for farm and ranch fences
is treated round post. Fisher says he goes
through thousands of it. Round post is
typically used with woven wire fences or
post and board fences, but it can be used
with just about any type of form fence.
Fisher recommends hot wire be installed
to keep the animals off the fence, and
the fence will hold up much longer with
less maintenance.
"Having good quality posts are key to
avoid deterioration as long as possible," he
says. "I recommend driving the posts into
the ground and making sure the posts always
get below the frost level, which is 32 inches
here in the Northeast. So, we always want

to be at least that deep with any post-otherwise you will see heaving of the post from
the freezing and thawing."
Jeff Koloski, sales manager at Cavatorta
North America in Whitinsville, Massachusetts,
says contractors must use proper fencing to
ensure the safety and containment for the type
of animals within the enclosure.
For example, when installing fencing at a
horse farm, there are various types of acceptable fencing, Koloski says. One of the more
common is the 2 × 4 11-gauge or 14-gauge
four-foot fencing. It can be galvanized only,
and Class 1 is preferred as it will last longer,
or it can be galvanized and then PVC coated
for a longer lasting and more aesthetically
appealing fence.
"This is often run along post and rail to
contain the horse," he says. "Horse fencing
must also be visible to the horses, so they
won't run into it and injure themselves."

www.americanfenceassociation.com | 23 | May/June 2018

It is also wise to look for a quality product
that may cost more up front but will provide
greater savings over the lifetime of the fence,
Koloski says. "When taking into consideration the labor involved to install the fence,
you don't want to have to replace it in four to
five years because the fence has broken wires
that could harm the horses," he says. "Some
of these 'box store' fences should be carefully
considered to ensure the less expensive fencing is really worth it in the long run."
Not all fencing is suitable for all animals,
Koloski says. Smaller animals need a smaller
mesh fencing, 2 × 1 or 1 × 1 mesh available
in various gauges. For hogs and cattle, it is
best to use a heavy-duty panel, 8-gauge or
11-gauge, to contain the animals as well as
protect them from intruders.
"Fence maintenance is extremely important when live animals are involved," he
says. "The weather, predators, as well as the


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Fencepost - May/June 2018

Editor’s Note
Executive Director’s Message
President’s Message
Board of Directors | Chapter Presidents Committee
Fencelines
Fenced In: Best Practices for Farm and Ranch Enclosures
CLFMI
Getting in the Loop
VMA
Long-Term Objectives of AFA’s Upcoming Certified Fence Contractor Program
5 Strategies to Give Your Fencing Company a Good Name
New Members
Solving the Puzzle
An Aging Workforce – Is 60 the New 40?
Chapter News
Fence Contractors: Manage Your Auto Fleet Risk
Minding Your Business
Calendar
Index to Advertisers
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Intro
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - cover1
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - cover2
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 3
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 4
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 5
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 6
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 7
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 8
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 9
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 10
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 11
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 12
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Editor’s Note
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 14
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Executive Director’s Message
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 16
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - President’s Message
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 18
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Board of Directors | Chapter Presidents Committee
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Fencelines
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 21
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Fenced In: Best Practices for Farm and Ranch Enclosures
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 23
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 24
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 25
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 26
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - CLFMI
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Getting in the Loop
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 29
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 30
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 31
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 32
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - VMA
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 34
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Long-Term Objectives of AFA’s Upcoming Certified Fence Contractor Program
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 36
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 5 Strategies to Give Your Fencing Company a Good Name
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 38
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - New Members
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Solving the Puzzle
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 41
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - An Aging Workforce – Is 60 the New 40?
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 43
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Chapter News
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 45
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Fence Contractors: Manage Your Auto Fleet Risk
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 47
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 48
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Minding Your Business
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Index to Advertisers
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - cover3
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - cover4
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