Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 29

GETTING
BY STEVEN H. MILLER

A

©ISTOCK.COM/VLADIMIR1965

s concern about security continues to increase, more facilities are
tightening vehicle access or even securing it for the first time. A great
variety of access control systems are available, but they almost all
have one thing in common: They depend on a vehicle detector for the other
elements of the system to function.
The most common method of vehicle
detection is a ground loop (also called a
detector loop), a simple coil of wire in the
pavement that makes everything else possible. If you're installing a fence system with
any kind of automatically operated gate or
access control system, there will probably
be one or more ground loops needed for
the system. Large commercial projects will
probably be fully specified by an architect,
engineer, or security consultant, but on a
simpler residential project, the installer may
have to supply most of the know-how.
Installing a ground loop is easy, and doing
it the right way is only slightly harder than a
mediocre installation-if you know what's
needed. Experts describe the technology
as very forgiving in the sense that, "If you
throw it in there, it'll probably detect something." But, if it's not installed correctly, it
may detect the wrong things or miss vehicles
when they're present, and it may not last
nearly as long as it ought to.
To help you get it right, we talked to several detector loop experts about best practices and installer pitfalls.
www.americanfenceassociation.com | 29 | May/June 2018

HOW LOOPS WORK

"In simple terms, it's a metal detector,"
says Ron Miller, manager of training and
technical support at DoorKing, Inc. of
Inglewood, California. "It's an electronic
field that tunes to the environment. If there's
metal in the area-metal grates, pipes,
etc.-it tunes to that. Then, it's looking for
a change. When metal enters the field, it
detects that change." He points out that
it's an inductive field, not a magnetic field,
and therefore it responds to any electrically
conductive metal, not just iron and steel.
"It works really well with aluminum, for
example," says Miller.
There are three major components: a loop
of wire in the pavement, a detector, and leadin wires that connect the loop to the box. The
detector is a box of electronics that sends a
current through the wire creating the induction field, and then senses the changes in the
field whenever new metal enters it.
You have probably seen ground loops
that control traffic signals: saw-cuts in the
pavement defining a 6' × 6' square, with 45°
cuts across the corners making an uneven


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Fencepost - May/June 2018

Editor’s Note
Executive Director’s Message
President’s Message
Board of Directors | Chapter Presidents Committee
Fencelines
Fenced In: Best Practices for Farm and Ranch Enclosures
CLFMI
Getting in the Loop
VMA
Long-Term Objectives of AFA’s Upcoming Certified Fence Contractor Program
5 Strategies to Give Your Fencing Company a Good Name
New Members
Solving the Puzzle
An Aging Workforce – Is 60 the New 40?
Chapter News
Fence Contractors: Manage Your Auto Fleet Risk
Minding Your Business
Calendar
Index to Advertisers
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Intro
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - cover1
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - cover2
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 3
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 4
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 5
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 6
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 7
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 8
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 9
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 10
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 11
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 12
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Editor’s Note
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 14
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Executive Director’s Message
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 16
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - President’s Message
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 18
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Board of Directors | Chapter Presidents Committee
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Fencelines
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 21
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Fenced In: Best Practices for Farm and Ranch Enclosures
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 23
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 24
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 25
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 26
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - CLFMI
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Getting in the Loop
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 29
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 30
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 31
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 32
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - VMA
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 34
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Long-Term Objectives of AFA’s Upcoming Certified Fence Contractor Program
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 36
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 5 Strategies to Give Your Fencing Company a Good Name
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 38
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - New Members
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Solving the Puzzle
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 41
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - An Aging Workforce – Is 60 the New 40?
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 43
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Chapter News
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 45
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Fence Contractors: Manage Your Auto Fleet Risk
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 47
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - 48
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Minding Your Business
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - Index to Advertisers
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - cover3
Fencepost - May/June 2018 - cover4
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