Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 12

FP2 president and Ingevity vice president
Andrew Crow moderates panel

On behalf of the Asphalt Recycling &
Reclaiming Association, Todd Thomas, Colas
Solutions Inc., presents paper co-authored with
Steve Cross, Oklahoma State University, on
asphalt recycling in United States

In the United States-and I'm sure in
most countries around the world it is no
different-we do not have a clear consensus for how to fund a national transportation system that eventually will no longer
depend on gasoline taxes as its primary
funding source. No doubt: addressing the
long-term needs of our national transportation infrastructure will require a broad
discussion among an evolving coalition
of interests.
WHY PRESERVATION MATTERS
While we anticipate the future and the
influence of new technologies, there is
another trend common among U.S. state
departments of transportation. That is,
state DOTs are directing their energy and
efforts toward maintaining the existing
system and operating that system as efficiently as possible.
12

Vince Bopat, director of sales for Bergkamp, Inc.,
outlines advancements in emulsion formulations

National Center for Pavement Preservation director
Judith Corley-Lay, Ph.D, P.E., discusses management
of the interstate system in North Carolina

The era of focusing largely on roadway
construction is over in the United States.
We have entered the era of asset management and system operation.
We have realized that it no longer makes
sense economically or otherwise to try and
build our way out of congestion. The cost
for new roads is growing. Construction on
new alignments can take years to earn
approval from local communities and environmental oversight agencies.
Meanwhile, we have an aging infrastructure that is requiring more and more
attention to keep roads and bridges in
good working order.
According to the American Road &
Transportation Builders Association in its
annual U.S. Bridge Conditions Report, nearly
nine percent of the U.S.'s roughly 612,000
bridges...more than 54,000 bridges...are
rated "structurally deficient."
That does not mean they are unsafe to
the traveling public. Of course, our states
and local agencies would close a bridge
if it was unsafe to cross, but this term
"structurally deficient" means that there
is some part of the bridge that is in need
of maintenance or repair.
And, if we think about it...we should
not be surprised that we have so many
structurally deficient bridges. The average age of those structurally deficient
bridges...is 67 years. The average age
of non-structurally deficient bridges is
40 years. That's only our bridges. Our state
DOTs are struggling to keep up with general road conditions as well.
The 2015 AASHTO Transportation Bottom
Line Report found that the current backlog in needed road, highway and bridge

improvements is $740 billion. According
to The Road Information Program, or TRIP,
a national transportation research group,
44 percent of the U.S.'s major roads are in
poor or mediocre condition. Meanwhile,
driving on these roads in need of repair
costs U.S. motorists $120 billion a year in
extra vehicle repairs and operating costs-
more than $550 per motorist.
So, while our system ages, and we
struggle with funding, the average U.S.
motorist-and the overall U.S. economy
for that matter-is paying higher costs in
repair bills, detours, and inefficiencies.
Our state DOT leaders understand this,
and their focus is increasingly on developing techniques for addressing maintenance backlogs and operating the system
most efficiently.
PERFORMANCE, ASSET MANAGEMENT
Let me define a couple of terms that
we are using in the U.S. Performance
Management is concerned with all areas
of transportation system performance,
including overall policy goals and objectives; multi-modalism; and how a transportation agency is performing.
Asset Management is concerned with
management of transportation physical assets, that is, determining how we
can maintain the system with the lowest
life-cycle cost.
And this is what state DOTs have
embraced-a pavement preservation strategy that is intended to extend the service
life of the road as long as possible.
Two major strategies include the use of
chip seals and micro surfacing. More than
80 percent of state DOTs recently surveyed

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018

President’s Message
PPRS Nice 2018: U.S. in Era of Asset Management, Pavement Preservation, Says Aashto’s Wright
Measuring Sustainability of Preservation and Eco-Efficiency of Cape Seals
Dedicated, Consistent Funding for World-Class Preservation Programs
As Loadings Rise, Preservation Data Gathers
‘Green’ Antistrip Offers Option in Pennsylvania
AEMA + ARRA + ISSA = PPRA
Profiles in Preservation: Surprises in Emulsions
Index of Advertisers
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Intro
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - cover1
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - cover2
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 3
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 4
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 5
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 6
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 7
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 8
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - President’s Message
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - PPRS Nice 2018: U.S. in Era of Asset Management, Pavement Preservation, Says Aashto’s Wright
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 11
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 12
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 13
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Measuring Sustainability of Preservation and Eco-Efficiency of Cape Seals
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 15
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 16
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 17
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 18
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 19
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 20
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 21
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Dedicated, Consistent Funding for World-Class Preservation Programs
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 23
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 24
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - As Loadings Rise, Preservation Data Gathers
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 26
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - ‘Green’ Antistrip Offers Option in Pennsylvania
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 28
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 29
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 30
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 31
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - AEMA + ARRA + ISSA = PPRA
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 33
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 34
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Profiles in Preservation: Surprises in Emulsions
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 36
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Index of Advertisers
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 38
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - cover3
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - cover4
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