Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 22

ASPECTS OF A WORLD-CLASS PRESERVATION PROGRAM

Dedicated, Consistent Funding
for World-Class Preservation Programs

I

n our previous article, the Pavement
Preservation Expert Task Group (PP ETG)
laid out the top ten characteristics of a
"world-class" pavement preservation
program. At the top of that list are programs
with dedicated and consistent funding.
Dedicated funding refers to specific funds
devoted solely to preservation, and consistency denotes that the amount funds
dedicated stay similar from year to year.
Without these two crucial components,
pavement preservation programs cannot
implement preservation treatments in a
timely manner. Identifying both dedicated and consistent funding often proves
difficult, yet Charleston County, S.C.'s
Transportation Development Department
has successfully managed to do both.
Editor's Note: The county's program is
so noteworthy that it received FP2's 2014
James B. Sorenson Award for Excellence
in Pavement Preservation (see Superior
Program Earns FP2 Award for Charleston
County, Summer 2015, pp 24-27, back
issues at fp2.org).
The story of Charleston County's pavement management program begins with
the formation of the County Transportation
Committee (CTC). In 1994, each of
the state's 46 counties formed a CTC,
whose members were nominated by the
Legislative Delegation.
The State of South Carolina collects taxes
for every gallon of gas sold. Of those collections, 2.66 cents are placed into a pot
of money called the "C" funds and then
distributed to each CTC. With the formation of these committees, counties were
given the option of self-administering and
managing the state's allocated "C funds," or
giving these responsibilities to the South
Carolina DOT.
PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT
The Charleston County Transportation
Committee (CCTC), which opted to
self-administer and manage its C funds,
took this dedicated funding and immediately began distributing 60 to 70 percent
of the money to pavement management.
22

In a previous issue, Pavement Preservation
Journal began a new series on the
attributes of the best pavement preservation
programs (see FHWA Expert Task Group
Defines World-Class Preservation Program,
Winter 2017, pp 21-25, back issues
at fp2.org). Developed by the Federal
Highway Administration Expert Task Group
on Pavement Preservation, and authored
by FHWA's James Gray, the article listed
10 elements that describe such programs.
We now continue with articles describing
each of those attributes in detail, the first
on dedicated funding.
Prior to the formation of the committee,
Charleston County managed road resurfacing using the cumbersome Paver program,
and paid for resurfacing through general
funds. The county did not have enough
funding to properly maintain an inventory
of all the roads within its limits, and therefore ended up putting all their resources
into fixing roads in the worst condition first.
With the newly created CCTC and the
promise of annual C funds, the county
decided to take an inventory of all the roads
and create a new pavement management
database. This database captured the condition of roads and categorized them into
excellent, very good, good, marginal, fair,
poor, and very poor.
By placing the condition of each road
into one of the aforementioned classifications, the CCTC and the pavement manager
on staff could easily identify which roads
needed funding, and how much funding
it would take to maintain the system. This
investment proved to be very beneficial in
the years to come and aided in securing
additional funding.
While the distribution of C funds filled the
need of dedicated funding, the consistency
of funding varied based on the amount of
gas sold within the state. Furthermore, the
amount of C funds received was still not
enough to maintain a completely effective
pavement management program.
The need for road maintenance,
paired with the increasing need for

infrastructure in Charleston County,
began the push for an additional source
of transportation funding.
On April 1, 1996, the Charleston Naval
Base closed for good. The naval base was
the largest civilian employer in South
Carolina, and its closing was a detrimental
blow to the area's economy. The need to
provide jobs to not only Charleston County,
but its neighboring Berkley and Dorchester
counties, became the No. 1 priority to the
area's metropolitan planning organization.
This need for economic growth inspired
the creation of a Class A industrial park.
To entice the necessary businesses to create an industrial park, the construction of
a commerce parkway became essential.
In conjunction with the need to form an
industrial park, the Cooper River Bridge,
which connects Charleston to Mount
Pleasant, S.C., was due to be replaced.
The state assembly agreed to fund half of
the new bridge's construction with a local
match from Charleston County of $75 million. The need to replace the Cooper River
Bridge, construct a commerce parkway, and
maintain Charleston County's ever growing
transportation infrastructure boiled down
to one common denominator: money.
TRANSPORTATION SALES TAX
The money to fund these important projects
came in the form of a 0.5-cent sales and
use tax. While Charleston County staff and
representatives were on board with a transportation sales tax (TST), county citizens
were not. It took three attempts to pass the
referendum, but in 2004 citizens agreed to
allow the collection of the 0.5-cent sales tax
for 25 years, or until $1.3 billion is collected.
The passing of the TST aided in funding the
Palmetto Commerce Parkway, the Arthur
Ravenel Bridge, and perhaps most importantly, provided a consistent $4 million in
resurfacing allocations annually.
With the dedicated and consistent
funding from the C funds and the TST,
Charleston County has had the opportunity
to significantly improve its pavement management program. The initial dedication

View past issues of the PAVEMENT PRESERVATION JOURNAL online at www.naylornetwork.com/fpp-nxt


http://www.fp2.org http://www.fp2.org http://www.naylornetwork.com/fpp-nxt

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018

President’s Message
PPRS Nice 2018: U.S. in Era of Asset Management, Pavement Preservation, Says Aashto’s Wright
Measuring Sustainability of Preservation and Eco-Efficiency of Cape Seals
Dedicated, Consistent Funding for World-Class Preservation Programs
As Loadings Rise, Preservation Data Gathers
‘Green’ Antistrip Offers Option in Pennsylvania
AEMA + ARRA + ISSA = PPRA
Profiles in Preservation: Surprises in Emulsions
Index of Advertisers
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Intro
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - cover1
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - cover2
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 3
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 4
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 5
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 6
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 7
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 8
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - President’s Message
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - PPRS Nice 2018: U.S. in Era of Asset Management, Pavement Preservation, Says Aashto’s Wright
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 11
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 12
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 13
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Measuring Sustainability of Preservation and Eco-Efficiency of Cape Seals
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 15
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 16
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 17
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 18
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 19
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 20
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 21
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Dedicated, Consistent Funding for World-Class Preservation Programs
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 23
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 24
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - As Loadings Rise, Preservation Data Gathers
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 26
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - ‘Green’ Antistrip Offers Option in Pennsylvania
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 28
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 29
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 30
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 31
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - AEMA + ARRA + ISSA = PPRA
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 33
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 34
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Profiles in Preservation: Surprises in Emulsions
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 36
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - Index of Advertisers
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - 38
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - cover3
Pavement Preservation Journal - Summer 2018 - cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0318
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0218
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0417
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0317
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0416
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0316
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0415
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0315
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0215
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FPPQ/FPPQ0115
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com