FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 11

In discussing financial and economic value, it is important to differentiate this from other intrinsic values that are extremely important to communities and are the bedrock of parks and recreation. These values, which include social and personal development factors that are extremely important to the well-being of a community, provide an important value that is not numerical or quantifiable. Financial values would center on the impact in the amount of dollars to a community. Communities are starting to perform regular assessment to determine this impact. "We do assessments on an annual basis of all parks that host tournaments and events," remarked Joe Abel, Director of Leisure Services for Seminole County. "The dollar amounts vary annually, but they include impacts ranging from $10 million to $20 million, with a new sports complex which is anticipated to generate over $40 million in economic impact in its first year of operations." This is indicative of the strides made in quantifying this impact as a result of the economic downturn in 2007. As the housing markets started to depreciate, government agencies were forced to downsize in an effort to deal with reduced property tax revenues. During this downsizing, parks and recreation agencies had to make an effort to quantify their value beyond the social values normally associated with parks and recreation. These efforts led to studies assessing economic impacts. Organizations such as the American Planning Organization, Trust for Public Land, Pennsylvania Trust Association and the Michigan Recreation and Park Association began conducting or commissioning studies and research on the economic impacts of parks and recreation. The results of these studies were encouraging. The first economic impact that was usually cited was that real property values are positively affected. The American Planning Organization, in its City Parks Forum Summary, noted that this has always been a real impact factor dating back to Frederick Law Olmstead's study on the economic impact of Central Park. The APA further cited other cities such as Atlanta, which saw large increases in property values adjacent to Centennial Park, and Amherst, Massachusetts. Other organizations found in their studies that this property value growth was not just for particular cities or projects. The National Association of Home Builders stated that the close proximity of park and recreation areas lead to the increase in value of ready building sites by up to as much as 20 percent. This is partnered with the Association's Report by Rose Quint finding that up to 60 percent of buyers were seriously influenced in their home buying decisions by the presence of trails or park areas. This impact becomes further realized with the addition of development in communities to continue to spur growth. Tony Lopez, Community and Leisure Chief of Operations for the town of Miami Lakes, notes the economic impact parks have on property development in his town in their latest project. "We are in the process of looking to convert In discussing financial and economic value, it is important to differentiate this from other intrinsic values that are extremely important to communities and are the bedrock of parks and recreation. These values, which include social and personal development factors that are extremely important to the well-being of a community, provide an important value that is not numerical or quantifiable. fall 2016 | frpa journal 11

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of FRPA Journal - Fall 2016

A Message from the President of FRPA
A Message from the Executive Director of FRPA
Parks and Recreation: What is the Real Value in What We Do?
FRPA Agency Profile
Book Review
Economic Impact of the Underline
Urban Forest Management – The City of Tampa’s Story
The Importance of Structural Pruning of Hardwood Trees
A City’s Rebirth through Park Improvements
“Thank You for My New Bicycle”
Florida’s Emerging Trail Towns
New Urbanism… What’s It All About?
Index of Advertisers
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover1
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover2
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 3
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 4
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 5
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 6
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A Message from the President of FRPA
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A Message from the Executive Director of FRPA
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 9
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Parks and Recreation: What is the Real Value in What We Do?
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 11
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 12
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - FRPA Agency Profile
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Book Review
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Economic Impact of the Underline
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Urban Forest Management – The City of Tampa’s Story
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 17
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - The Importance of Structural Pruning of Hardwood Trees
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 19
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A City’s Rebirth through Park Improvements
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 21
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - “Thank You for My New Bicycle”
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 23
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Florida’s Emerging Trail Towns
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - New Urbanism… What’s It All About?
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Index of Advertisers
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover3
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0218
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0417
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0317
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0416
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0316
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0415
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0315
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0215
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0115
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com