FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 12

an abandoned highway overpass into a large green passive open space and mobility corridor," states Lopez. "Our town is in need of green space, and this project will also be adjacent to a new 500-home development that will provide economic growth and impact to the community as a whole." Another noted impact in many studies and discussions is the impact of events, tournaments and tourism. This impact is usually measured in the indirect cost benefit that the influx of people into a community can provide. In certain urban communities, there is quantifiable revenue these outside events bring, regardless of the size of the community. This quantifiable evidence is obtained by the performance of the affected businesses. A common example is the athletic tournament. The city of Debary hosts a Babe Ruth Regional Baseball Tournament at their athletic facilities. The nearby vendors felt a positive economic impact due to the tournament. "We have a Winn-Dixie and a Subway near our tournament site," stated John Fletcher, Director of Parks and Recreation for city of Debary. "Both of them reported the highest revenue weekend in their existence. They stated to us that this was a direct result of the tournament." 12 This is typical of these types of events and tournaments. The increase in visitors provides increases in revenues for restaurants, grocery stores and lodging providers. Cities such as Miami Beach, Coral Gables and Miami see increases in parking revenues and permit fees for the provision of space and public right of ways. In 2013 Des Moines, Iowa worked with the University of Northern Iowa to conduct a study on the economic impact of their parks and recreation services. The study found the impacts were those already described - increase in property values and related event revenues, but there were also other impact factors. One factor was the cost savings to residents. Residents are able to use facilities rather than use private providers, thus providing cost savings. This availability and the value for residents is another impact Florida agencies are providing. Don Decker, Parks and Recreation Director for the city of Weston, noted the value in having facilities available, citing a newly renovated hockey rink project. "I have had a tremendous boost in requests from outside organizations hoping to use them...Our priority is and always has been to have use for our View past issues of FRPA Journal at www.naylornetwork.com/frp-nxt/ residents. There is no doubt substantial revenue could be generated if it was not a priority." The Northern Iowa study found that private providers of recreation and park activities were more costly to participants, anywhere from five to 70  percent depending on the activity. More open activities such as trail or playground use were on the lower end of the range, and participation in classes and leagues were on the higher end of the range. The impact on Des  Moines was a cost savings of $646,000 to residents annually. Cities providing their facilities and programs in a manner such as Weston will provide substantial impact in the form of cost savings to their participants. These and other factors, such as environmental savings and stormwater conservation, all tell the story of the value of parks and recreation. The question is: What is the real value in parks and recreation? The answer is varied with different value impacts. Statewide, it can be millions of dollars in property value increases, millions of dollars in revenues received for area businesses and other government operations, or millions of dollars saved by participants using agency facilities. One upon a time, the value of parks and recreation was that they make people happy. Thankfully, this remains the "real" value, and now other values allow agencies to reinforce their worth in a community. ■ Economic Impact and Development is one of four pillars of the FRPA Strategic Plan. We hope this article has stimulated your thought on the impact your Agency has on your community. To read more about the studies cited in this article, please visit: American Planning Association - https:// www.planning.org/cityparks/briefing papers/economicdevelopment.htm Des Moines Study - www.uni.edu National Home Builders Association - https://www.nahb.org/en/research/ housing- economics/special-studies/ what-home-buyers-want-2013.aspx The Pennsylvania Land Trust Association - http://conservationtools.org/ guides/98-economic-benefits-of-parks Michigan Recreation and Parks Association - www.mparks.org http://www.nrpa.org/parkeconreport http://www.planning.org/cityparks/briefingpapers/economicdevelopment.htm http://www.uni.edu https://www.nahb.org/en/research/housing-economics/special-studies/what-home-buyers-want-2013.aspx http://www.conservationtools.org/guides/98-economic-benefit-of-parks http://www.mparks.org http://www.naylornetwork.com/frp-nxt/

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of FRPA Journal - Fall 2016

A Message from the President of FRPA
A Message from the Executive Director of FRPA
Parks and Recreation: What is the Real Value in What We Do?
FRPA Agency Profile
Book Review
Economic Impact of the Underline
Urban Forest Management – The City of Tampa’s Story
The Importance of Structural Pruning of Hardwood Trees
A City’s Rebirth through Park Improvements
“Thank You for My New Bicycle”
Florida’s Emerging Trail Towns
New Urbanism… What’s It All About?
Index of Advertisers
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover1
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover2
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 3
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 4
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 5
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 6
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A Message from the President of FRPA
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A Message from the Executive Director of FRPA
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 9
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Parks and Recreation: What is the Real Value in What We Do?
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 11
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 12
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - FRPA Agency Profile
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Book Review
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Economic Impact of the Underline
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Urban Forest Management – The City of Tampa’s Story
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 17
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - The Importance of Structural Pruning of Hardwood Trees
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 19
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A City’s Rebirth through Park Improvements
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 21
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - “Thank You for My New Bicycle”
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 23
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Florida’s Emerging Trail Towns
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - New Urbanism… What’s It All About?
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Index of Advertisers
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover3
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover4
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