FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 18

The Importance of Structural Pruning of Hardwood Trees PHOTO: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM By Brian Hopper, CPRP, ISA Certified Arborist Most cities perform maintenance tree pruning on an annual basis. Typically, canopies are simply raised for clearance, to prevent vehicular, pedestrian or signage obstructions and branches are trimmed off of buildings. Unfortunately, due to lack of manpower or funding, tree work is often done on a reactive, rather than a proactive basis. Therefore, an important type of tree pruning that very often falls by the wayside is structural pruning of hardwood canopy trees. Structural pruning is essential for these trees, to ensure strong form. In general terms, structural pruning improves the actual strength of a tree's branches and makes it less susceptible to breaking in the event of a storm. There are three main aspects to structural pruning: 1) elimination of crossing branches, 2) reduction or removal of branches with weak attachment to the trunk and 3) influencing overall canopy development. It is important to eliminate any main branches that cross over one another, as their rubbing together over time can cause injury that forms decay. This creates a weak spot on the branch that is likely to break. One of the branches needs to be reduced to a lateral branch before the crossing point, or possibly removed all together to eliminate this problem. Branches that have a narrow angle of attachment (often resulting in included bark) should be reduced in length or 18 possibly completely removed. A strong branch union on canopy trees is rather cup-shaped or u-shaped. When the branches emanate from the trunk at a sharp angle or v-shape bark often gets trapped between the branch and the trunk, which is called included bark. This is similar to driving a wedge between the branch and the trunk. When the branch gets large/heavy and a storm comes along, it is much more likely tear off from the trunk. The last aspect of structural pruning is performing pruning cuts that affect the eventual mature form of a tree. Typically, a tree with a central main leader is stronger than one with codominant leaders (or main trunks of the same size). The centermost leader should be left to grow and the codominant ones to the sides can be reduced in height by cutting View past issues of FRPA Journal at www.naylornetwork.com/frp-nxt/ http://WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM http://www.naylornetwork.com/frp-nxt/

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of FRPA Journal - Fall 2016

A Message from the President of FRPA
A Message from the Executive Director of FRPA
Parks and Recreation: What is the Real Value in What We Do?
FRPA Agency Profile
Book Review
Economic Impact of the Underline
Urban Forest Management – The City of Tampa’s Story
The Importance of Structural Pruning of Hardwood Trees
A City’s Rebirth through Park Improvements
“Thank You for My New Bicycle”
Florida’s Emerging Trail Towns
New Urbanism… What’s It All About?
Index of Advertisers
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover1
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover2
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 3
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 4
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 5
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 6
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A Message from the President of FRPA
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A Message from the Executive Director of FRPA
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 9
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Parks and Recreation: What is the Real Value in What We Do?
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 11
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 12
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - FRPA Agency Profile
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Book Review
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Economic Impact of the Underline
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Urban Forest Management – The City of Tampa’s Story
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 17
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - The Importance of Structural Pruning of Hardwood Trees
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 19
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - A City’s Rebirth through Park Improvements
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 21
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - “Thank You for My New Bicycle”
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - 23
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Florida’s Emerging Trail Towns
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - New Urbanism… What’s It All About?
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - Index of Advertisers
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover3
FRPA Journal - Fall 2016 - cover4
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0218
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0118
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0417
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0317
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0217
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0117
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0416
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0316
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0216
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0116
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0415
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0315
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0215
https://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/FRPQ/FRPQ0115
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com