The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 8

ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING
THEORY AS A PREDICTOR OF

CONSERVATION

PRACTICES

By Jonathan Myers, Ph.D., Assistant Superintendent, Noble Public Schools, Noble, Oklahoma and
Jeffrey Maiden, Ph.D., Professor, Educational Administration, Curriculum and Supervision, University of Oklahoma
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether organizational learning theory is a viable predictor of the degree to which
an energy management program in public schools may change
employee beliefs and behaviors regarding energy usage practices.
As school districts are faced with escalating costs and stagnant or
reduced levels of financial support, the reduction of rising utility
costs is critical. Understanding the role of organizational learning
as a vehicle for changing employee practices (and potentially
reducing costs) is a significant contribution to a theoretical understanding of organizational learning theory and practice regarding
energy conservation.

ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING
There are various definitions of organizational learning in the
scholarly literature (Probst & Büchel, 1997). Argote (2011) defines
organizational learning as a change in the organizational knowledge
that occurs as a function of experience. Dixon (1994) posits "the
8

intentional use of learning processes at the individual,
group and system level to continuously transform the
organization in a direction that is increasingly satisfying
to its stakeholders" (p. 5). According to Probst and Büchel
(1997), organizational learning is the "ability of the institution as a whole to discover errors and correct them, and to
change the organization's knowledge base and values so as
to generate new problem-solving skills and new capacity for
action" (p. 167). Yukl (2009) defines organizational learning as
"collective learning by members of the organization" (p. 49)
and that organizational learning's essential processes include
the discovery of relevant new knowledge, the diffusion of this
new knowledge to members of the organization who need it, and
finally the application of the new knowledge to improve internal
processes and external adaptation.
According to many scholars, the organizational learning process
consists of four primary steps: knowledge acquisition, knowledge
sharing, information interpretation, and memorizing (Aslam, Javaid,

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017

Letter from the Editor
Organizational Learning Theory as a Predictor of Energy Conservation Practices
Illinois Support for Public Education Ranks Dead Last Among 50 States
Property Tax Extension Limitation Law (PTELL) Utilizes the Wrong Economic Indicator
Building a Better Foundation
Index of Advertisers/Advertiser.com
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - Intro1
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - cover1
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - cover2
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 3
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 4
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 5
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 6
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - Letter from the Editor
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - Organizational Learning Theory as a Predictor of Energy Conservation Practices
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 9
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 10
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 11
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 12
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 13
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 14
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 15
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 16
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 17
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - Illinois Support for Public Education Ranks Dead Last Among 50 States
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 19
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 20
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 21
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - Property Tax Extension Limitation Law (PTELL) Utilizes the Wrong Economic Indicator
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 23
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 24
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 25
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 26
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 27
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - Building a Better Foundation
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - 29
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - Index of Advertisers/Advertiser.com
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - cover3
The Journal of School Business Management - Spring/Summer 2017 - cover4
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