Constructor - March/April 2018 - 31

Materials have
come a long way
since the days of
wood and stone,
though these
tried, true and
tough structures
are among the
most revered
and certainly
among
the loveliest.

Night rendering of the Pensacola Bay Bridge. The 3.7-mile long project will replace the existing four-lane bridge.
Photo courtesy of Skanska

For Gregory Fullington, a selfdescribed "Lincoln Log and Lego kid,"
there was no other career option. Now
a project executive for Skanska US Civil,
a member of multiple AGC chapters, he
graduated from the University of Florida
with a civil engineering degree in 2000
and immediately set about identifying the
companies that specialized in bridges.
"The technical nature of their construction has always been interesting
to me because it's so challenging...."
he explains. "When you build a bridge,
you're usually trying to span something
that's impassable."
For others, the focus is on community.
"The uniqueness of the structures and
settings [are exciting]," says Jeff St. John,
senior project manager for The Walsh
Group, a member of multiple AGC chapters, which in recent years has notched
several signature bridges into its tool
belt, among them the $763-million Ohio
Rivers Bridges East End Crossing Project
in Louisville, Kentucky.
"Simply determining how to build
these structures in the first place, then
getting them built safely and successfully,
can be both challenging and satisfying
..." but, for these, the bridge's intended
purpose and presence become a centerpiece of the surrounding community."
Materials have come a long way since
the days of wood and stone, though these
tried, true and tough structures are among
the most revered and certainly among the
loveliest. In 2018, a full century since AGC
@Constr uctor Ma g

took shape, advances in materials like
concrete and techniques like modeling
have made the practice more efficient,
effective and - perhaps most importantly
in these days of crumbling infrastructure
- a little bit closer to everlasting.

CLASSIC CONNECTIONS
Bridges have always been marvels, if
not for their beauty and engineering, then
for the very reason they were built: closing gaps between communities, allowing
for commerce and communication.
Historian Ken Durr cites a few for posterity: Maryland's beautiful Casselman
River Bridge, which when completed in
1814, was the largest single-span stone
arch bridge in the country.
"It was part of the great 'National
Road' project across the Appalachians,"
he explains, "and still one of the most
beautiful bridges in the United States.
It's an arch, a classic."
The Eads Bridge, a St. Louis, Missouri,
notable, was important for a number of
reasons, says Durr, not the least of which
was its namesake.
"James Eads got his start working in
the Mississippi River in the salvage business. He did diving in the Mississippi; he
knew it well," Durr explains. "And he also
channelized the Mississippi for the Army
Corps of Engineers. This bridge was the
first to use caissons, and the first to use
steel arches."
Upon completion in 1874, it was the
longest arch bridge in the world. What's

more, it allowed trains to roll into St.
Louis without unloading onto riverboats;
it meant residents west of the Mississippi
had easier access to points east (which
is where much of American civilization
was back then), and even locals could
amble across its upper deck for views
never before imagined.
Modern materials of the day - and
modern construction methods in the
cantilever support methods used - had
allowed for a marvel, much as these
things do today.

PRESENT PROGRESSIONS
"In looking over the past 100 years,
it's incredible to see how much the bridge
construction industry has evolved,"
says Carlos del Val Cura. "Technology
has enabled us to build stronger, more
enduring structures, safer ... and on
shorter timelines."
As a vice president specializing in
infrastructure for McHugh Construction,
a Chicagoland AGC member, del Val
Cura's 20-plus years with the company
have seen him working a host of bridge
projects, including Chicago's 35th Street
Pedestrian & Bicycle Bridge, an elegant,
curving suspension bridge that gave
South Side residents enhanced lakefront access.
It was a project, he says, that required
coordination with the City of Chicago
to minimize vehicle disruption on Lake
Shore Drive, but with Metra, the city's
commuter rail - which runs 24/7. Crews

MA R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 8 | www.constructormagazine.com 31


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Constructor - March/April 2018

Editor’s Note
President’s Message
CEO’s Letter
Focused on the Future
Simonson Says
2018 Construction Outlook: Positive but Workforce Challenges Persist
Span Cycles
Chapter Connection
Technology Toolbox
Legislative and Regulatory News
Member and Chapter News
Products & Services Marketplace
Index to Advertisers
Constructor - March/April 2018 - intro
Constructor - March/April 2018 - cover1
Constructor - March/April 2018 - cover2
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 3
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 4
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 5
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 6
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Editor’s Note
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 8
Constructor - March/April 2018 - President’s Message
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 10
Constructor - March/April 2018 - CEO’s Letter
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Focused on the Future
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 13
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 14
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 15
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 16
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 17
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 18
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Simonson Says
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 20
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 2018 Construction Outlook: Positive but Workforce Challenges Persist
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 22
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 23
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 24
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 25
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 26
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 27
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 28
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Span Cycles
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 30
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 31
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 32
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 33
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 34
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Chapter Connection
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 36
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Technology Toolbox
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 38
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Legislative and Regulatory News
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 40
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 41
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 42
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Member and Chapter News
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 44
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Products & Services Marketplace
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 46
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 47
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 48
Constructor - March/April 2018 - Index to Advertisers
Constructor - March/April 2018 - 50
Constructor - March/April 2018 - cover3
Constructor - March/April 2018 - cover4
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