PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 25

❱❱ ASK THE EXPERT
BY BRITTANY CAMPBELL, PH.D., NPMA STAFF ENTOMOLOGIST

Q:

I had a customer bring in a shipping crate from China with fly
pupae. I didn't find any live
flies, so what should I do for control?
Depending on where the crate
entered the U.S. and what was
in it, some shipping crates are
inspected by the United States Department
of Agriculture to limit the entry of invasive
plants and animals. Special attention is paid
to pests of high importance that can cause
significant damage and must undergo quarantine if found. Food and plant products are
typically inspected to ensure they are not
infested. Be sure to ask the customer what
was shipped in the crate and what port the
crate was shipped into because it may be
beneficial to contact the local port inspection station.
First and foremost, the insect in question
should be positively identified to determine
further action. If live insects are found, fumigation of the container would kill all insects
and eliminate any concern of their spread. If
you haven't found any live insects and the
pupae appear to have hatched, then the
container should be thoroughly cleaned to
remove any insect evidence. The container
can be vacuumed to pick up any insect debris
and the container should be scrubbed to
remove any pupal cases.

A:

Q:

I found these
tiny, hairy
insects in the
basement along the
wall. I've never seen
anything like it-is it a
common pest indoors?
The arthropod
pic tured is
actually not an
insect but is a duff millipede in the family
Polyxenidae. They are sometimes confused
with dermestid beetle larvae because of their
hairy appearance. They often are found along
walls indoors and feed on decaying organic
matter. Like other millipede species, duff millipedes are an occasional invader and wander indoors when conditions outside are not
suitable. Indoor migrations can occur with
large numbers making an appearance, often

during hot, dry summer months. Like many
pests, duff millipedes harbor in areas where
there is a moisture source that would facilitate
the growth of fungus and algae to feed on.
They are not dangerous to humans and do
not cause any damage to homes. Control
should consist of sealing cracks and crevices, removing mulch and woody debris
around the exterior foundation, and
eliminating excessive moisture indoors
where the pests were found.

Q:

I have a client who has an ice
cream parlor who keeps finding
phorid flies in the grease trap.
There are hundreds flying around the top
of the grease trap-how can I control them?
Phorid flies will breed and feed
in drains and other organic matter. They are referred to as humpback flies because their thorax has a humped,
enlarged shape. To control phorid flies, you
must eliminate their food source and breeding sites. Grease traps and plumbing are
common areas where phorid flies are found
breeding because of the accumulation of
organic matter in these areas.
Microbial formulations, especially foaming agents, should be used to treat drains.
The grease trap should be cleaned to remove
organic matter and then microbial agents can
also be used in conjunction for grease trap
maintenance over time. Microbial treatments
of drains and the grease trap will only affect
the larvae breeding in the organic matter,
so insect light traps can be used to capture
adults that may be flying around in the ice
cream shop.

A:

Q:

Can you explain the new
OSHA Respirable Silica Rule
and how it can impact pest
management companies?
The Occupational Safety and
Health Administration (OSHA) is
the federal governing entity that
ensures safety in the workplace. The new
Respirable Silica Rule goes into effect for
the general industry on June 23, 2018 and
requires that employers must comply at that
time. For the pest control industry, this rule
affects any job that creates silica dust during
a job task-so it primarily impacts termite
jobs that require drilling into concrete, brick
and mortar. Respirable crystalline silica can
be detrimental to worker's health and can
cause serious issues, including silicosis, lung
cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease (COPD). There are a couple of options
to ensure compliance, but one option is to
outfit handheld drills (rotary hammer drills)
with a dust collection system. For more
information regarding this rule, visit NPMA's
OSHA toolbox, www.qualityprotools.org/
osha-toolbox/respirable-silica. ●

A:

NATALIIA K/MELINDA FAWVER/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

A:

PESTWORLD > JULY | AUGUST 2018

| 25


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of PestWorld - July/August 2018

President’s Message
PLANNING FOR GROWTH
MARKETING FOR GROWTH
TECHNOLOGY TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS
Marketing Corner: 5 Ways to Keep Your Company Newsworthy
Membership Programs: NPMA Health Insurance
Ask the Expert
Standards: QualityPro Accreditation
Calendar of Events
Index of Advertisers
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - Intro
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - cover1
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - cover2
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 3
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 4
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 5
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 6
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 7
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 8
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - President’s Message
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - PLANNING FOR GROWTH
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 11
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 12
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 13
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - MARKETING FOR GROWTH
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 15
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 16
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 17
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - TECHNOLOGY TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 19
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 20
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - Marketing Corner: 5 Ways to Keep Your Company Newsworthy
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - Membership Programs: NPMA Health Insurance
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 23
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 24
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - Ask the Expert
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - Standards: QualityPro Accreditation
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 27
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 28
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - 29
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - Index of Advertisers
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - cover3
PestWorld - July/August 2018 - cover4
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